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The qml viewer (for 4.8 and 5.0) is implemented like that:

In the .h(eader) we have:

class QtQuick2ApplicationViewer : public QQuickView
{
    Q_OBJECT

...

private:
    class QtQuick2ApplicationViewerPrivate *d;
};

Then in the .CPP file:

class QtQuick2ApplicationViewerPrivate
{
    QString mainQmlFile;
    friend class QtQuick2ApplicationViewer;
    static QString adjustPath(const QString &path);
};

QtQuick2ApplicationViewer::QtQuick2ApplicationViewer(QWindow *parent)
    : QQuickView(parent)
    , d(new QtQuick2ApplicationViewerPrivate())
{
    connect(engine(), SIGNAL(quit()), SLOT(close()));
    setResizeMode(QQuickView::SizeRootObjectToView);

#ifdef Q_OS_ANDROID
    engine()->setBaseUrl(QUrl::fromLocalFile("/"));
#endif
}

Why is using friend necessary here? I don't see any reason why would anybody use a friend class. Is there any real use for friend classes (except for exotics that anybody could live without)?

.h #include

class QtQuick2ApplicationViewer : public QQuickView
{
    Q_OBJECT

public:
    explicit QtQuick2ApplicationViewer(QWindow *parent = 0);
    virtual ~QtQuick2ApplicationViewer();

    void setMainQmlFile(const QString &file);
    void addImportPath(const QString &path);

    void showExpanded();

private:
    class QtQuick2ApplicationViewerPrivate *d;
};

.cpp

#include "qtquick2applicationviewer.h"

#include <QtCore/QCoreApplication>
#include <QtCore/QDir>
#include <QtQml/QQmlEngine>

class QtQuick2ApplicationViewerPrivate
{
    QString mainQmlFile;
    friend class QtQuick2ApplicationViewer;
    static QString adjustPath(const QString &path);
};

QString QtQuick2ApplicationViewerPrivate::adjustPath(const QString &path)
{
#ifdef Q_OS_UNIX
#ifdef Q_OS_MAC
    if (!QDir::isAbsolutePath(path))
        return QString::fromLatin1("%1/../Resources/%2")
                .arg(QCoreApplication::applicationDirPath(), path);
#elif !defined(Q_OS_ANDROID)
    const QString pathInInstallDir =
            QString::fromLatin1("%1/../%2").arg(QCoreApplication::applicationDirPath(), path);
    if (QFileInfo(pathInInstallDir).exists())
        return pathInInstallDir;
#endif
#endif
    return path;
}

QtQuick2ApplicationViewer::QtQuick2ApplicationViewer(QWindow *parent)
    : QQuickView(parent)
    , d(new QtQuick2ApplicationViewerPrivate())
{
    connect(engine(), SIGNAL(quit()), SLOT(close()));
    setResizeMode(QQuickView::SizeRootObjectToView);

#ifdef Q_OS_ANDROID
    engine()->setBaseUrl(QUrl::fromLocalFile("/"));
#endif
}

QtQuick2ApplicationViewer::~QtQuick2ApplicationViewer()
{
    delete d;
}

void QtQuick2ApplicationViewer::setMainQmlFile(const QString &file)
{
    d->mainQmlFile = QtQuick2ApplicationViewerPrivate::adjustPath(file);
    setSource(QUrl::fromLocalFile(d->mainQmlFile));
}

void QtQuick2ApplicationViewer::addImportPath(const QString &path)
{
    engine()->addImportPath(QtQuick2ApplicationViewerPrivate::adjustPath(path));
}

void QtQuick2ApplicationViewer::showExpanded()
{
#if defined(Q_WS_SIMULATOR)
    showFullScreen();
#else
    show();
#endif
}
share|improve this question
    
You've got two completely unrelated questions in there. Please don't do that. Post one question per, well, question. (i.e. you should probably edit your post to leave only one of the questions.) – Mat Oct 25 '12 at 14:58

Friends examine friends' privates. You sure can do without access restrictions at all, but once you use it, being friendly helps in intimate situations.

share|improve this answer
3  
well, friendship isn't commutative, but I assume you just wrote that for the lulz +1 – Luchian Grigore Oct 25 '12 at 15:01
    
Well, being specific about the direction of friendship would ruin the prose, so I just avoided being plainly wrong ;) – Michael Krelin - hacker Oct 25 '12 at 15:03
    
I don't let my friends examine my privates. – Rafael Baptista Oct 25 '12 at 15:05
2  
In my experience when that happens, friendship doesn't last much longer afterwards. – Zingam Oct 25 '12 at 16:00
    
@Zingam, true, may happen. – Michael Krelin - hacker Oct 25 '12 at 18:03
class Me;
class You {
    friend class Me;
private:
    Home _home;
    Car _car;
public:
    void bar(Me my);
};

class Me {
    Stuff _stuff;
public:
    foo(You you) {
       //If you consider me a friend
       you._home.enter(); //I can enter your `private _home`
       you._car.drive();  //I can drive your `private _car`.
    }
};

void You::bar(Me my) {
     my.stuff //this is an error because I don't consider you a friend so you can't touch my `private _stuff`.
}
share|improve this answer

Knowing you can always count on me, for sure. That's what friends are for. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGbnua2kSa8

But I guess you're asking about friend classes in C++.

The whole point of "scope" is to define exactly who can see what in another class. You don't "need friends" any more than you need "protected" or "private", in the sense that you could make everything in all your classes public, and your program would successfullly compile and run. But the idea is to establish -- and document -- exactly what is the public interface of a class, and thus cannot be changed without considering the impact on other classes, and what is an internal implementation, which can be freely re-worked or re-organized without fear of impacting other classes.

So the point of a "friend" is to say: Hey, I have this class X, and this other class Y. And in general other classes don't need to know how X goes about doing it's job. But Y interacts with some low-level thing in X, so it needs to see it. Thus I make Y a friend of X. Like, I have an Investor class that has a function that (presumably among other things) has a function to calculate the total amount of a customer's investments. In general, other classes shouldn't care how I do that calculation: they just want the total. But now I have a TaxReporting class that needs to know how much of that balance is in taxable securities and how much is in non-taxable securities. Maybe I don't want to make these functions public because the information is confidential and I want to limit access for real-world privacy reasons. More often, I don't want to make it public because the calculation is tricky or subject to frequent change, and I want to keep tight control on what classes access it to limit the problems caused when things change. So I make TaxReporting a friend so it can access some functions that make the distinction, without opening these to the world.

In practice, when I was doing C++ I rarely used friends. But "rarely" is not "never". If you find yourself saying, "Oh, I have to make this public just so this one other class can see it", then maybe instead of making it public you should make a friend.

share|improve this answer

"friend" is super useful and something you want to use all the time.

Typical use cases are:

You have a class that uses subclasses where the subclass is allowed to use private functions of the class that owns the subclasses:

class ManagedObject
{
public:
   void doStuff() { mMgr->updateManager(); }

private:
   Manager* mMgr;
};

class Manager
{
   friend ManagedObject;
public:
   ManagedObject* createManagedObject();

private:
   void updateManager() { }
};

So in this case you have a class that creates and deals with "managedObject". Whenever this object is manipulated it needs to update the object that created it. You want users of your class to know that they don't ever need to call "updateManager" and in fact wat to generate a compile time error if they do.

Another common case is when you have a function which acts like a class member but cannot for some reason be a class member. An example is operator<<. If you write your own io stream class, or if you want to create a serialization system that users operator<<:

class serializedObject
{
public:
   friend Serializer& operator<< ( Serializer& s, const serializedObject& obj );
protected:
   u32 mSecretMember;
};

Serializer& operator<<( Serializer& s, serializedObject& obj )
{
    serializer << obj.mSecretMember;
    return s; 
}

In this case the serialization function cannot be a member of serializedObject, but needs to look at the internals of serializedObject to serialize it. You will see similar patterns of you create other operators ( like addition ) where the RHS of the operator is not the same class as the LHS

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of encapsulation? Isn't there any better way to achieve the same effect? Do you have any idea why the use a friend class in my example above. I don't see any reason for it to exist. – Zingam Oct 25 '12 at 15:58
    
I can't tell from the code snippet. ApplicationViewerPrivate is all private. I don't see a constructor there. It could be that the constructor is private, and the ApplicaitonViewer needs to be friend to access the constructor. Hiding a constructor for a class that can only be constructed by a class factory is a common pattern as well. Prevents anyone but friend classes from instantiating an object. – Rafael Baptista Oct 25 '12 at 16:44
    
Further - friend doesn't 'defeat' encapsulation - but enables it. Geneerally you want to lock everything down as const and private/protected and then just allow what needs to be allowed, but making only some members public, or friending just some classes to a class which is all locked down. – Rafael Baptista Oct 25 '12 at 16:45
    
I have posted the full source code of the class now. Even after your explanation cleared the theory for me, I still fail why that was coded that way. – Zingam Oct 26 '12 at 20:37

In Qt, there is something called a 'guarantee of binary compatibility', which means that your app can run against Qt4.8, 4.8.1, and 4.8.2 and so forth without recompiling.

In order to achieve this the vtable for objects cannot change. So, Qt classes are written using the "PIMPL" (pointer to implementation) idiom.

The "Private" class is the PRIVATE implementation of the public class - it is an implementation detail of QtQuick2ApplicationViewer. No one in the whole world knows about the private class except the public class. These two classes are deeply intertwined by design. In fact, they are really different aspects of a single object that has been partitioned c++ wise in order to achieve the binary compatibility guarantee.

It is reasonable in this context that the private class can access the public class.

share|improve this answer

2) In this context quit is not QApplication::quit(), that is slot of cause, but some internal signal of engine().

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