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In this example I've only got two tables with which I'm working. I was checking to see which might run faster and the execution plans were identical. The purpose of these queries is to find the minimum date associated with one record that's larger than the maximum date of another. The first query is more concise (although it doesn't allow the DATEDIFF column the second one does). I feel like writing a query the second way will, in the long run, be more costly performance wise, perhaps when I have many joins. Are there any general rules about which method, or is it a case by case scenario and you let the optimizer work it out?

first

select c.patid,min(c.admitDate) as minDiabetesDate
    from clm_extract as c
    inner join icdClm as ic on ic.clmid=c.clmid
    where ic.icd like '250%' 
    group by c.patid
    having min(c.admitdate) > 
    (
        select MAX(c2.admitDate) as maxPreDiabetesDate
            from clm_extract as c2
            inner join icdClm as ic2 on ic2.clmid = c2.clmid
            where ic2.icd ='79029' and c2.patid=c.patid
            group by c2.patid
    )

second

select distinct x.patid,x.minDiabetesDate,y.maxPreDiabetesDate 
from
(   

select c.patid, min(c.admitdate) as minDiabetesDate
    from clm_extract as c 
    inner join icdClm as ic on ic.clmid=c.clmid
    where ic.icd like '250%'
    group by c.patid
)x
inner join 
(
select c2.patid, MAX(c2.admitdate) as maxPreDiabetesDate
    from clm_extract as c2
    inner join icdClm as ic2 on ic2.clmid=c2.clmid
    where ic2.icd ='79029'
    group by c2.patid
)y on x.patid=y.patid
group by x.minDiabetesDate,y.maxPreDiabetesDate,x.patid
having DATEDIFF(dd,y.MaxPreDiabetesDate,x.minDiabetesDate) > 0
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have already observed that the two queries have the same execution plan. This is not surprising. SQL is a descriptive language not a procedural language. That is, the language describes what is being produced, not the method for producing it.

When you execute an in statement or an exists statement with a subquery, you are executing a join. The syntax is difference, but logical processing is the same. It is just another way of expressing the join. There are some differences that the engine needs to take into account. For instance, An "IN" is doing an inner join with an implicit distinct on the subquery.

As a matter of preference, I prefer the second version. I like to have tables used in a query mentioned in the from clause when possible.

After thinking about your query, there is an easier way to write it:

select c.patid,
       min(case when ic.icd like '250%' then c.admitDate end) as minDiabetesDate,
       MAX(case when ic.icd = '79029' then c.admitDate end) as maxPreDiabetesDate
from clm_extract c
     inner join
     icdClm ic
     on ic.clmid=c.clmid
where ic.icd like '250%' or ic.icd = '79029' 
group by c.patid
having MAX(case when ic.icd = '79029' then c.admitDate end) <
       min(case when ic.icd like '250%' then c.admitDate end) 

This uses the case statement in conjunction with aggregation functions to calculate the date that you want. By the way, you are using a datediff in your having clause. This is unnecessary for a simple comparison. You can just use "=", "<", and so on to compare dates.

share|improve this answer
    
i like the use of the min and max like this. hadn't thought of that before. – wootscootinboogie Oct 25 '12 at 16:25

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