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I apologize if my question doesn't quite make sense. Let me explain the scenario in detail.

I have a MySQL table called "elements". In that table are two MEDIUMINT fields, one called "user_id" and one called "element_id".

I'd like to pull out users (checking each one individually one at a time) who have a row in the table with element_id=8 and a row in the table with an element_id=9.

I've tried the following query but it doesn't work. Any ideas?

SELECT * FROM elements WHERE user_id=2 AND (element_id=8 AND element_id=9)
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2  
Just change the second AND into OR: SELECT * FROM elements WHERE user_id=2 AND (element_id=8 OR element_id=9) –  Aleks G Oct 25 '12 at 15:28
    
beat me to it! @AleksG –  TerryProbert Oct 25 '12 at 15:29
    
Let's say I have another user in there with a single row of "user_id"=3 and "element_id"=8. That user doesn't have a row with "element_id"=9 in that table. If I ran the suggested query, but with user_id=3, there would be a valid result. I don't want this. I only want the result to be valid if the user has BOTH rows, not one OR the other. Make sense? –  Tim Jahn Oct 25 '12 at 15:38
    
Why would anyone deliberately use MEDIUMINT for an identifier field? –  tadman Oct 25 '12 at 16:59

3 Answers 3

Nanne's solution works:

SELECT * FROM elements as e, elements as ee WHERE e.user_id=2 AND e.element_id=8 AND e.user_id=ee.user_id AND ee.element_id=9
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this

a) the row that has a "user_id" value of 2 and "element_id" value of 8, and b) the row that has a "user_id" value of 2 and "element_id" value of 9.

translates to

(user_id = 2 AND element_id = 8) OR (user_id = 2 AND element_id = 9)

Which is the same as (closer to your own try)

user_id=2 AND (element_id=8 OR element_id=9)
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I tried that as well. But I don't want one row OR the other. I want both rows. –  Tim Jahn Oct 25 '12 at 15:31
    
that is what it means. Did you try it? you get ALL rows that EITHER are one OR the other. If you are looking for rows that have ALL those features, you'll get nothing. lets say you are looking for all people with blue and with green jackets, you would need to put in jacket=blue OR jacket=green. that's just how boolean logic works. If you'd put jacket=blue AND jacket=green you look for persons that IN ONE JACKET have both colors. (ok, that could be possible, but not with jackets that have only 1 color. so bad example) –  Nanne Oct 25 '12 at 16:32
    
No, that's not what it means, and yes, I did try the query. I want users from the table that have BOTH rows in the table. So, if user_id=3 has a row with element_id=8 and a row with element_id=9, then I want him. If he only has element_id=8 in the table (and no 9), I DO NOT want him. The suggested query here does NOT accomplish this. –  Tim Jahn Oct 25 '12 at 16:40
1  
That's not easily figured out from your question, I suggest you try and update the question a bit to reflect that. Anyway, you could a simple join on the same table (with a different alias) and find out if there is a row that has both element 8 and 9 for user 2. –  Nanne Oct 25 '12 at 16:56
    
Updated the question to hopefully clarify. Thanks for the join suggestion, I'll give that a whirl. –  Tim Jahn Oct 25 '12 at 16:59

According to Aleks G, what he suggest should work.

SELECT * FROM elements WHERE user_id=2 AND (element_id=8 OR element_id=9)

Should retrieve all rows with user_id equals to "2" with element_id equals to "8" (if exists) AND element_id equals to "9" (if exists) even thought it says "OR" work like "Include it if exists in the results as well".

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Ahh now i understand, then it should be like this SELECT * FROM elements WHERE user_id=2 AND element_id IN (8,9) try it this way it should work. –  Welling Oct 25 '12 at 16:52
    
Unfortunately, that new suggested query still works if the user only has one row, rather than both. :( –  Tim Jahn Oct 25 '12 at 16:57
    
Tim so you have to use subquery in this, if you use a query like this. SELECT * FROM elements WHERE user_id = 2 AND element_id IN (8,9) HAVING COUNT(element_id) = 2 will return you the first row and not two, so we have to use this query as subquery something like this. SELECT * FROM elements WHERE user_id IN (SELECT user_id FROM elements WHERE user_id = 2 AND element_id IN (8,9) HAVING COUNT(element_id) = 2) AND element_id IN(8,9) maybe this is not the best way but should work and return you two rows with user_id = 2 only if has element_id of 8 and 9. give it a try. –  Welling Oct 25 '12 at 17:50

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