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I am building a custom shopping cart where CC numbers and Exp date will be stored in a database until processing (then deleted). I need to encrypt this data (obviously).

I want to use the RSACryptoServiceProvider class.

Here is my code to create my keys.

public static void AssignNewKey(){
    const int PROVIDER_RSA_FULL = 1;
    const string CONTAINER_NAME = "KeyContainer";
    CspParameters cspParams;
    cspParams = new CspParameters(PROVIDER_RSA_FULL);
    cspParams.KeyContainerName = CONTAINER_NAME;
    cspParams.Flags = CspProviderFlags.UseMachineKeyStore;
    cspParams.ProviderName = "Microsoft Strong Cryptographic Provider";
    rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(cspParams);

    string publicPrivateKeyXML = rsa.ToXmlString(true);
    string publicOnlyKeyXML = rsa.ToXmlString(false);
    // do stuff with keys...
}

Now the plan is to store the private key xml on a USB drive attached to the managers key chain.

Whenever a manager leaves the company I want to be able to generate new public and private keys (and re-encrypt all currently stored CC numbers with the new public key).

My problem is that the keys generated by this code are always the same. How would I generate a unique set of keys every time?

UPDATE. My test code is below.:
note: the "privatekey" parameter here is the original private key. In order for the keys to be changed I need to verify that the private key is valid.

In Default.aspx.cs

public void DownloadNewPrivateKey_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fileUpload.FileContent);
    string privateKey = reader.ReadToEnd();
    Response.Clear();
    Response.ContentType = "text/xml";
    Response.End();
    Response.Write(ChangeKeysAndReturnNewPrivateKey(privateKey));
}

In Crytpography.cs:

public static privateKey;
public static publicKey;
public static RSACryptoServiceProvider rsa;

public static string ChangeKeysAndReturnNewPrivateKey(string _privatekey)
{

    string testData = "TestData";
    string testSalt = "salt";
    // encrypt the test data using the exisiting public key...
    string encryptedTestData = EncryptData(testData, testSalt);
    try
    {
        // try to decrypt the test data using the _privatekey provided by user...
        string decryptTestData = DecryptData(encryptedTestData, _privatekey, testSalt);
        // if the data is successfully decrypted assign new keys...
        if (decryptTestData == testData)
        {
            AssignNewKey();
            // "AssignNewKey()" should set "privateKey" to the newly created private key...
            return privateKey;
        }
        else
        {
            return string.Empty;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }
}
public static void AssignParameter(){
    const int PROVIDER_RSA_FULL = 1;
    const string CONTAINER_NAME = "KeyContainer";
    CspParameters cspParams;
    cspParams = new CspParameters(PROVIDER_RSA_FULL);
    cspParams.KeyContainerName = CONTAINER_NAME;
    cspParams.Flags = CspProviderFlags.UseMachineKeyStore;
    cspParams.ProviderName = "Microsoft Strong Cryptographic Provider";
    rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(cspParams);
}
public static void AssignNewKey()
{
    AssignParameter();

    using (SqlConnection myConn = new SqlConnection(Utilities.ConnectionString))
    {
        SqlCommand myCmd = myConn.CreateCommand();

        string publicPrivateKeyXML = rsa.ToXmlString(true);
        privateKey = publicPrivateKeyXML; // sets the public variable privateKey to the new private key.

        string publicOnlyKeyXML = rsa.ToXmlString(false);
        publicKey = publicOnlyKeyXML; // sets the public variable publicKey to the new public key.

        myCmd.CommandText = "UPDATE Settings SET PublicKey = @PublicKey";
        myCmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@PublicKey", publicOnlyKeyXML);
        myConn.Open();

        myComm.ExecuteScalar();
    }
}
public static string EncryptData(string data2Encrypt, string salt)
{
    AssignParameter();

    using (SqlConnection myConn = new SqlConnection(Utilities.ConnectionString))
    {
        SqlCommand myCmd = myConn.CreateCommand();

        myCmd.CommandText = "SELECT TOP 1 PublicKey FROM Settings";

        myConn.Open();

        using (SqlDataReader sdr = myCmd.ExecuteReader())
        {
            if (sdr.HasRows)
            {
                DataTable dt = new DataTable();
                dt.Load(sdr);
                rsa.FromXmlString(dt.Rows[0]["PublicKey"].ToString());
            }
        }
    }

    //read plaintext, encrypt it to ciphertext
    byte[] plainbytes = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(data2Encrypt + salt);
    byte[] cipherbytes = rsa.Encrypt(plainbytes, false);
    return Convert.ToBase64String(cipherbytes);
}
public static string DecryptData(string data2Decrypt, string privatekey, string salt)
{
    AssignParameter();

    byte[] getpassword = Convert.FromBase64String(data2Decrypt);

    string publicPrivateKeyXML = privatekey;
    rsa.FromXmlString(publicPrivateKeyXML);

    //read ciphertext, decrypt it to plaintext
    byte[] plain = rsa.Decrypt(getpassword, false);
    string dataAndSalt = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(plain);
    return dataAndSalt.Substring(0, dataAndSalt.Length - salt.Length);
}
share|improve this question
    
How are you testing this? –  Austin Salonen Aug 20 '09 at 16:55
    
I am basically calling the AssignNewKey() function from a .net page and then checking the new "publicPrivateKeyXML" against my the previous version. I'll update the question above to include my test code. –  David Murdoch Aug 20 '09 at 18:14
2  
This is a bit tangential, but do you realise that in order to store credit card numbers you need your system to be PCI compliant? See stackoverflow.com/questions/4300863/… –  Art May 3 '12 at 5:23
    
yup, that is actually what sparked this question. though we ended up using an external payment provider in the end. –  David Murdoch May 3 '12 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

Do you known that every time you use a code like this:

using (var rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(1024))
{
   // Do something with the key...
   // Encrypt, export, etc.
}

.NET (actually Windows) stores your key in a PERSISTENT key container - forever? And let's not mention the name of the key container is randomly generated by .NET...

The result is:

  1. Any random RSA/DSA key you have EVER generated for the purpose of protecting data, creating custom X.509 certificate, etc. has LEAKED in the Windows file system. For everyone who has access to your account to claim it. And you thought your data was safe...

  2. Your disk is being slowly filled with data. Normally not a big concern but it depends on your application (e.g. it might generates hundreds of keys every minute).

So what do you do to avoid this rather UNEXPECTED behavior?

using (var rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(1024))
{
   try
   {
      // Do something with the key...
      // Encrypt, export, etc.
   }
   finally
   {
      rsa.PersistKeyInCsp = false;
   }
}

ALWAYS

Update:

Want to see for yourself?

Use this tools http://www.jensign.com/KeyPal/index.html. I have several thousand on my machine.

share|improve this answer
    
I have exactly the same need as the OP; the public key's going in a DB, the private key's going into secured storage on a thumb drive. So, if I used your example code, but the first line was rsa.FromXMLString(pubKey), then neither the generated key nor the loaded one is persisted to a store? –  KeithS Dec 19 '12 at 15:49
    
Does initializing the RSACryptoServiceProvider with CspParameters() { Flags = CspProviderFlags.CreateEphemeralKey }) accomplish the same thing? –  Computer Linguist Feb 22 '13 at 12:17

The RSACryptoServiceProvider(CspParameters) constructor creates a keypair which is stored in the keystore on the local machine. If you already have a keypair with the specified name, it uses the existing keypair.

It sounds as if you are not interested in having the key stored on the machine.

So use the RSACryptoServiceProvider(Int32) constructor:

public static void AssignNewKey(){
    RSA rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(2048); // Generate a new 2048 bit RSA key

    string publicPrivateKeyXML = rsa.ToXmlString(true);
    string publicOnlyKeyXML = rsa.ToXmlString(false);
    // do stuff with keys...
}

EDIT:

Alternatively try setting the PersistKeyInCsp to false:

public static void AssignNewKey(){
    const int PROVIDER_RSA_FULL = 1;
    const string CONTAINER_NAME = "KeyContainer";
    CspParameters cspParams;
    cspParams = new CspParameters(PROVIDER_RSA_FULL);
    cspParams.KeyContainerName = CONTAINER_NAME;
    cspParams.Flags = CspProviderFlags.UseMachineKeyStore;
    cspParams.ProviderName = "Microsoft Strong Cryptographic Provider";
    rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(cspParams);

    rsa.PersistKeyInCsp = false;

    string publicPrivateKeyXML = rsa.ToXmlString(true);
    string publicOnlyKeyXML = rsa.ToXmlString(false);
    // do stuff with keys...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Correct; I guess I am not interested in having the key stored on the machine. If I use the RSACryptoServiceProvider(Int32) constructor the following code gives me a "The system cannot find the file specified." error. RSA rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(2048); rsa.ToXmlString(true); –  David Murdoch Aug 20 '09 at 19:08
    
Since I'm running this in asp.net could that be the problem? –  David Murdoch Aug 20 '09 at 19:23
    
Yes, the problem is probably because the "Network Service" cannot generate keys in the user store. –  Rasmus Faber Aug 20 '09 at 20:18
    
All I want is a public key (stored on the server), a private key (stored with manager), and method to encrypt and decrypt some data securely using these keys. I don't want anything stored on the machine by default. Why is this so hard? Are there any alternatives you might suggest? –  David Murdoch Aug 20 '09 at 20:54
    
Did you see the edit I made? Try setting PersistKeyInCsp to false. –  Rasmus Faber Aug 21 '09 at 6:00
up vote 5 down vote accepted

What I ended up doing is create a new KeyContainer name based off of the current DateTime (DateTime.Now.Ticks.ToString()) whenever I need to create a new key and save the container name and public key to the database. Also, whenever I create a new key I would do the following:

public static string ConvertToNewKey(string oldPrivateKey)
{

    // get the current container name from the database...

    rsa.PersistKeyInCsp = false;
    rsa.Clear();
    rsa = null;

    string privateKey = AssignNewKey(true); // create the new public key and container name and write them to the database...

       // re-encrypt existing data to use the new keys and write to database...

    return privateKey;
}
public static string AssignNewKey(bool ReturnPrivateKey){
     string containerName = DateTime.Now.Ticks.ToString();
     // create the new key...
     // saves container name and public key to database...
     // and returns Private Key XML.
}

before creating the new key.

share|improve this answer
1  
it would be nice if you posted complete solution as I can't figure out what's being done in the comments –  Shane Km Jun 12 '13 at 9:54
1  
Sorry, I can't even remember what project this was for. –  David Murdoch Jun 12 '13 at 13:38

protected by Community Jun 9 '11 at 13:47

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