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After parsing the JSON response from a webservice using NSJSONSerialization, I use +isKindOfClass: to make sure the server returned the kind of data I expect. Using this method, I ran into some weird behaviour, which I'll illustrate using an example.

Consider the following objects:

// Definitions
NSDictionary *son = @{ @"firstname" : @"James", @"lastname" : @"Appleseed" };
NSDictionary *daughter = @{ @"firstname" : @"Susan", @"lastname" : @"Appleseed"};
NSArray *children = @[son, daughter];
NSDictionary *father = @{ @"firstname" : @"John", @"lastname" : @"Appleseed" };
NSDictionary *family = @{@"children" : children, @"father" : father};
NSDictionary *pedigree = @{@"family" : family };

Those objects represent deserialized JSON returned from a server. Now if I want to use the array of children to calculate how much children there are using NSArray's -count, I need to make sure the children object is an NSArray. If the children object for example happens to be a string, while the app expects an array, it'll crash because strings don't implement a count method. Consider the following code sequence which implements the described check:

// First test
id _family = [pedigree objectForKey:@"family"];
if ([_family isKindOfClass:[NSDictionary class]])
{
    NSDictionary *_family = (NSDictionary *)_family;
    id _children = [_family objectForKey:@"children"];

    NSLog(@"Children: %@", _children);
    NSLog(@"Children classname: %@", NSStringFromClass(children.class));

    if ([_children isKindOfClass:[NSArray class]]) {
        NSLog(@"Children is an NSArray");
    } else {
        NSLog(@"Children is not an NSArray");
    }
} else {
    NSLog(@"Family is not an NSDictionary");
}

After running this code, the console outputs the following:

Children: (null)
Children classname: __NSArrayI
Children is not an NSArray

The console output appears to be extremely remarkable and even contradictory. How could children not be an NSArray while its classname is __NSArrayI?

After a bit of debugging, I found that there are two ways to solve this problem:

  1. remove this line NSDictionary *_family = (NSDictionary *)_family;
  2. use a different name than _family for the casted variable

How could this behaviour be explained?

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Generally you should not use variable names beginning with _ for local variables. The _ prefix is reserved for the instance variables behind properties and for system names. (As you can see from your problem, there are good reasons to observe this rule.) –  Hot Licks Oct 25 '12 at 16:21
    
I know, this was just for the example. –  datwelk Oct 25 '12 at 19:36
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the line

NSDictionary *_family = (NSDictionary *)_family;

you define a new variable _family in the current scope, which makes the outer variable _family invisible. Objective-C pointers are initialized to nil if you compile with ARC.

And the output is not contradictory, because you print

NSStringFromClass(children.class);

which is the class of children (without the underscore), which is an array. But _children (with underscore) is nil because _family is nil as explained above.

In fact you don't need a type cast if you expect a dictionary. You could just do

NSDictionary *_family = [pedigree objectForKey:@"family"];
if ([_family isKindOfClass:[NSDictionary class]])
{
    NSArray *_children = [_family objectForKey:@"children"];

    if ([_children isKindOfClass:[NSArray class]]) {
        NSLog(@"Children is an NSArray");
    } else {
        NSLog(@"Children is not an NSArray");
    }
} else {
    NSLog(@"Family is not an NSDictionary");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Dangit, the children.class was a stupid typo. Thanks for explaining. –  datwelk Oct 25 '12 at 16:13
    
@datwelk: You are welcome. –  Martin R Oct 25 '12 at 16:15
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Your variable children contains an array, your variable _children is nil.

This explains the first NSLog that prints (null) (because you log _children, not children), but the second NSLog that prints __NSArrayI (because you print the class of the children object, not the class of the nil _children variable.

Your third NSLog says that it is not an array because you check for [_children isKindOfClass:...] and _children is nil, so [nil isKindOfClass:...] returns NO.


So to solve your problem, you have to figure out why your _children variable is nil (while your children variable isn't).

And this is obviously because you use a _family variable that shadows its parent. So the line NSDictionary *_family = (NSDictionary *)_family; obviously use the internal _family variable, and has the exact same behavior as if you wrote NSDictionary *foo = (NSDictionary *)foo;: as this foo is nil, casting it to whatever you want will still make it nil.

Use a different name for your internal _family variable to avoid the second _family variable shadows the outer _family variable, and your problem will go away. Or better, remove this line completely, as there is no problem calling a method on id without casting (that's what id is for, actually)

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