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I am using C# and I am creating an ArrayList called "importControlKeys" which creates fine. However, I can't for the life of my figure out a way to loop through the arrayList and pick out the values in the ArrayList for use in later code.

I know I'm missing something easy, but what is the syntax to extract a value from an ArrayList. I was hoping it was somethign like importControlKeys[ii].value in my code below, but that isn't working.

I've searched on these boards and can't find the exact solution, though I'm sure it's easy. msot of the solutions say to re-write as a List but I have to believe there is a way to get data out of an array list without re-writing as a List

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            ArrayList importKeyList = new ArrayList();
            List<DataGridViewRow> rows_with_checked_column = new List<DataGridViewRow>();
            foreach (DataGridViewRow row in grd1.Rows) 
            { 
                if (Convert.ToBoolean(row.Cells[Del2.Name].Value) == true)
                { 
                    rows_with_checked_column.Add(row);
                    importKeyList.Add(row.Cells[colImportControlKey.Name].Value);

                    //string importKey = grd1.Rows[grd1.SelectedCells[0].RowIndex].Cells[0].Value.ToString();
                    //grd1.ClearSelection();
                    //if (DeleteImport(importKey))
                    //    LoadGrid();
                }                
            }
            for (int ii = 0; ii < rows_with_checked_column.Count; ii++)
            {
                //grd1.ClearSelection();
                string importKey = importKeyList[ii].value;  //ERRORS OUT

                if (DeleteImport(importKey))
                    LoadGrid();

                // Do what you want with the check rows  
            }

        }
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1  
what error is your code getting? –  Sam I am Oct 25 '12 at 15:59
    
I'm using an arrylist because I'm editing someone else's code and prefer not to re-write. I see that i'm suppose dto use List,T. based on numerous suggestions but I have no idea what that is and when i try to re-write i can't get any part of this code to work. –  Ryan Ward Oct 25 '12 at 16:15
    
What happens when you compile/run the code –  Sam I am Oct 25 '12 at 17:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure why you are using an ArrayList but if you need to loop thru it you could do something like this this

if an element is not convertible to the type, you'll get an InvalidCastException. In your case, you cannot cast boxed int to string causing an exception to be thrown.

foreach (object obj in importKeyList ) 
{
    string s = (string)obj;
    // loop body
}

or you do a for loop

for (int intCounter = 0; intCounter < importKeyList.Count; intCounter++)
{
    object obj = importKeyList[intCounter];
    // Something...
}
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Ah there we go. This gets me going down my eventual path. i'll need to do some more stuff to do more conversions (for some bizarre reason the item input into the lsit is an integer but we pass it through to future code as a string). Thanks for this. –  Ryan Ward Oct 25 '12 at 16:19

well, what you can do instead is

foreach(object o in importKeyList)
{ 
    string importKey = (string)o;
    // ...

}

you can replace the (string) with whatever type you need

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foreach (object o in importKeyList)
{ 
    // Something...
}

or

for (int i = 0; i < importKeyList.Count; i++)
{
    object o = importKeyList[i];
    // Something...
}
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You can't call .value on your string list...

So this:

string importKey = importKeyList[ii].value;

Should be:

string importKey = importKeyList[ii];
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You really shouldn't use an ArrayList in the first place, if you have a choice, you should use a List<T>. ArrayList has been effectively deprecated since .NET 2.0. There are no advantages to using it over List other than for legacy applications which can't or haven't been updated. The reason List is preferred is that when you store data in an ArrayList it is just stored as an object, so an object is what you get out. You need to cast it to what it really is so that you can use it.

Without knowing the actual types that you're storing in the ArrayList I couldn't tell you what type of List it should be, or what you need to cast the result into.

Also note that you can use a foreach loop, rather than a for loop, to go through all of the items in the list/arraylist, which is often syntactically easier.

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Just drop the .value:

string importKey = (string)importKeyList[ii];
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for (int Counter = 0; Counter < Key.Count; Counter++)

{

object obj = Key[Counter];
}

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provide details.... –  Somnath Kharat Sep 11 '13 at 9:51

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