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I'm trying to do 'pre-flight checks' by testing a COM port's 'openability' before launching a dialog window which allows the user to do com-porty things.

Here's the code sequence, in outline:

handle = CreateFile("\\\\.\\COM4:", GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE, 0,NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, FILE_FLAG_OVERLAPPED,NULL);

if (handle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
{
  CloseHandle(handle);
  DoTheWork("\\\\.\\COM4:");
}
else
{ 
  ShowMessage("I'm sorry Dave, I can't do that"); 
} 

...

void DoTheWork(char * port)
{
  handle = CreateFile(port, GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE, 0,NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, FILE_FLAG_OVERLAPPED,NULL);
  /// do lots of stuff
  CloseHandle(port);
}

Here's the problem: "DoTheWork" is a tried and tested function, and performs correctly on it's own. It only fails when called immediately after the earlier CreateFile/CloseHandle calls, when the second CreateFile returns E_ACCESSDENIED.

Worse yet, if I step through the code slowly in the debugger, It works just fine.

It seems like I need a Sleep() after the first closeHandle, but that feels like a hack - and i have no way of knowing how long it must be.

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1  
why not keep the handle open and pass it to DoTheWork? –  David Aug 20 '09 at 16:19
    
@David, I didn't want to touch a working part of the system - however, I now have no choice ;-) –  Roddy Aug 20 '09 at 16:28

3 Answers 3

The system takes a bit of time to close the resource. There's probably some arcane way to test whether it's been freed, but I don't know what that is. What I do know is that if you check the registry key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\HARDWARE\DEVICEMAP\SERIALCOMM

You'll see which serial ports are available without having to open them, which should solve your problem.

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That shows me which ports are installed, but it won't show me which ones are actually openable (ie, not already opened by some other code) –  Roddy Aug 20 '09 at 16:27

Try calling PurgeComm() or FlushFileBuffers() on the handle before closing it.

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Well, after more trawling, I found this, which relates to Windows CE rather than Win32.

There is a two-second delay after CloseHandle is called before the port is closed and resource are freed.

I guess the same applies to Win32, but I haven't found any documented proof.

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1  
Its probably related - but part of the reason for the delay under ce was the lack of availability of FlushFileBuffers() on some platforms. –  sylvanaar Aug 20 '09 at 17:27

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