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I would like to use .focus() to advance my slider to the next screen. I have next and back buttons. If a user clicks the next button, I do not want the .focus() function to advance the slider. However if focus is on the next button, I'd like the focus to trigger the next button .click() function.

This is the way I have it now. When I tab and place focus on the next button, the slider advances. When I click the next button, the slider is advanced two times.

$(".nextbutton4").focus(function() {
     $(".nextbutton4").click();
});

I came up with another version of the focus() function with an if-else statement, but it doesn't work.

// This allows a tab advancement to trigger the next action
$(".nextbutton4").focus(function() {
    if (//This is where I would like to check whether the button was clicked) {
          alert('Next Button is Clicked');
          // Do Nothing
    }
    else {
          alert('Next Button Not Clicked');
          $(".nextbutton4").click();
     }  
});
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You could try adding a class when the user clicks the link:

$('.nextbutton4').click(function() { $(this).addClass('clicked'); });

And then simply check to see if it has the class:

// This allows a tab advancement to trigger the next action
$(".nextbutton4").focus(function() 
{
    if ($(this).hasClass('clicked')) 
    {
          alert('Next Button is Clicked');
          // Do Nothing
    }
    else 
    {
          alert('Next Button Not Clicked');
          $(this).click();
     }  
});
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great solution, however it doesn't stop the duplication of the advancement during click. –  Nick Rivers Oct 25 '12 at 16:35
    
When a user clicks the next button, focus is applied to the button. It then fires the click function and the focus function. –  Nick Rivers Oct 25 '12 at 16:37
    
It would be better to intercept the click function and call the nextSlide function through logic, rather than triggering the actual click event... –  BenM Oct 25 '12 at 16:39

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