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Consider an algorithm that needs to determine if a string contains any characters outside the whitelisted characters.

The whitelist looks like this:

'-.abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ ÇüéâäàåçêëèïîìÄÅÉæÆôöòûùÖÜáíóúñÑÀÁÂÃÈÊËÌÍÎÏÐÒÓÔÕØÙÚÛÝßãðõøýþÿ

Note: spaces and apostrophes are needed to be included in this whitelist.

Typically this will be a static method, but it will be converted to an extension method.

private bool ContainsAllWhitelistedCharacters(string input)
{
  string regExPattern="";// the whitelist
  return Regex.IsMatch(input, regExPattern);
}

Considerations:

Thanks for the performance comments to all the answerers. Performance is not an issue. Quality, readability and maintainability is! Less code = less chance for defects, IMO.

Question:

What should this whitelist regex pattern be?

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2  
If you make an extension method for string like that, it suggests that all strings are subject to a whitelist for what they can and can't contain, but that's not true. –  Sam Harwell Aug 20 '09 at 16:21
    
@28: thanks for the comment. I realize the method would be available to all string members. It'd be up to the developer to wisely call the extension method, just as with its implementation as a utility method. –  p.campbell Aug 20 '09 at 16:36
    
@pcampbell: You should create an immutable struct that holds a string that's known to not contain any bad characters (checked in the constructor). That way, unlike the Path class, you can operate on the string without having to perform an O(n) check for bad characters. –  Sam Harwell Aug 20 '09 at 22:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could pattern match using the following:

^([\-\.a-zA-Z ÇüéâäàåçêëèïîíìÄÅÉæÆôöòûùÖÜáíóúñÑÀÁÂÃÈÊËÌÍÎÏÐÒÓÔÕØÙÚÛÝßãðõøýþÿ]+)$

Make it an extension method with:

public static bool IsValidCustom(this string value)
{
    string regExPattern="^([\-\.a-zA-Z ÇüéâäàåçêëèïîíìÄÅÉæÆôöòûùÖÜáíóúñÑÀÁÂÃÈÊËÌÍÎÏÐÒÓÔÕØÙÚÛÝßãðõøýþÿ]+)$";
    return Regex.IsMatch(input, regExPattern);
}

I can't think of an easy way to do a maintainable range with extended characters since the order of the characters is not obvious.

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Attention with charsets. –  Havenard Aug 20 '09 at 16:20
    
I think the above pattern will require a slight tweak to allow blank values. Also, consider using the built-in character class "\w" instead of trying to enumerate the alphabet of all supported languages. That will bring in underscores and digits, which would then require a second RegEx to exclude, but would save a lot of potential maintenance down the road trying to re-invent the character class. –  richardtallent Aug 20 '09 at 16:31
1  
I have tested it and it works for spaces. It's a hardcoded list of values, the space is included after the Z. THe only ranges are the characters from a-z and A-Z –  Kelsey Aug 20 '09 at 16:35

Why does it have to be a regex?

private bool ContainsAllWhitelistedCharacters(string input)
{
  string whitelist = "abcdefg...";
  foreach (char c in input) {
    if (whitelist.IndexOf(c) == -1)
      return false;
  }
  return true;
}

No need to jump straight into regexes if you aren't sure how to implement the one you need and you haven't profiled that section of code and found out you need the extra performance.

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Umm... this doesn't work so why all the upvotes? It will not catch if there is invalid characters in the string. –  Kelsey Aug 20 '09 at 16:27
    
Thanks Mark. Unfortunately this suggestion IndexOfAny doesn't return filter out un-whitelisted characters like '_' or '5'. –  p.campbell Aug 20 '09 at 16:28
    
Yeah, I just realized that and took it out -- that really shouldn't have gotten any upvotes. No way anybody who upvoted it even read it :X –  Mark Rushakoff Aug 20 '09 at 16:30

I don't know how the regex backend is implemented, but it might be the most efficient to use the following to match for anything besides your list:

private bool ContainsAllWhitelistedCharacters(string input)
{
   Regex r = new Regex("[^ your list of chars ]");
   return !r.IsMatch(test)
}
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3  
Double negatives aren't not confusing. –  Thomas G. Mayfield Aug 20 '09 at 16:49
    
I agree, I suggested doing it this way assuming it's a more efficient regex in c#. Does anyone know if this is true or not? I'm interested in the answer. –  Mark Synowiec Aug 20 '09 at 17:32

Note that I do not recommend this unless performance is really a problem but I thought I would point out that, even including precompiling the regex, you can do quite a bit faster:

compare:

static readonly Regex r = new Regex(
  @"^(['\-\.a-zA-Z ÇüéâäàåçêëèïîíìÄÅÉæÆôöòûùÖÜáíóúñÑ"+
   "ÀÁÂÃÈÊËÌÍÎÏÐÒÓÔÕØÙÚÛÝßãðõøýþÿ]+)$");

public bool IsValidCustom(string value)
{
  return r.IsMatch(value);
}

with:

private bool ContainsAllWhitelistedCharacters(string input)
{
    foreach (var c in input)
    {
        switch (c)
        {
            case '\u0020': continue; 
            case '\u0027': continue; 
            case '\u002D': continue; 
            case '\u002E': continue; 
            case '\u0041': continue; 
            case '\u0042': continue; 
            case '\u0043': continue; 
            case '\u0044': continue; 
            case '\u0045': continue; 
            case '\u0046': continue; 
            case '\u0047': continue; 
            case '\u0048': continue; 
            case '\u0049': continue; 
            case '\u004A': continue; 
            case '\u004B': continue; 
            case '\u004C': continue; 
            case '\u004D': continue; 
            case '\u004E': continue; 
            case '\u004F': continue; 
            case '\u0050': continue; 
            case '\u0051': continue; 
            case '\u0052': continue; 
            case '\u0053': continue; 
            case '\u0054': continue; 
            case '\u0055': continue; 
            case '\u0056': continue; 
            case '\u0057': continue; 
            case '\u0058': continue; 
            case '\u0059': continue; 
            case '\u005A': continue; 
            case '\u0061': continue; 
            case '\u0062': continue; 
            case '\u0063': continue; 
            case '\u0064': continue; 
            case '\u0065': continue; 
            case '\u0066': continue; 
            case '\u0067': continue; 
            case '\u0068': continue; 
            case '\u0069': continue; 
            case '\u006A': continue; 
            case '\u006B': continue; 
            case '\u006C': continue; 
            case '\u006D': continue; 
            case '\u006E': continue; 
            case '\u006F': continue; 
            case '\u0070': continue; 
            case '\u0071': continue; 
            case '\u0072': continue; 
            case '\u0073': continue; 
            case '\u0074': continue; 
            case '\u0075': continue; 
            case '\u0076': continue; 
            case '\u0077': continue; 
            case '\u0078': continue; 
            case '\u0079': continue; 
            case '\u007A': continue; 
            case '\u00C0': continue; 
            case '\u00C1': continue; 
            case '\u00C2': continue; 
            case '\u00C3': continue; 
            case '\u00C4': continue; 
            case '\u00C5': continue; 
            case '\u00C6': continue; 
            case '\u00C7': continue; 
            case '\u00C8': continue; 
            case '\u00C9': continue; 
            case '\u00CA': continue; 
            case '\u00CB': continue; 
            case '\u00CC': continue; 
            case '\u00CD': continue; 
            case '\u00CE': continue; 
            case '\u00CF': continue; 
            case '\u00D0': continue; 
            case '\u00D1': continue; 
            case '\u00D2': continue; 
            case '\u00D3': continue; 
            case '\u00D4': continue; 
            case '\u00D5': continue; 
            case '\u00D6': continue; 
            case '\u00D8': continue; 
            case '\u00D9': continue; 
            case '\u00DA': continue; 
            case '\u00DB': continue; 
            case '\u00DC': continue; 
            case '\u00DD': continue; 
            case '\u00DF': continue; 
            case '\u00E0': continue; 
            case '\u00E1': continue; 
            case '\u00E2': continue; 
            case '\u00E3': continue; 
            case '\u00E4': continue; 
            case '\u00E5': continue; 
            case '\u00E6': continue; 
            case '\u00E7': continue; 
            case '\u00E8': continue; 
            case '\u00E9': continue; 
            case '\u00EA': continue; 
            case '\u00EB': continue; 
            case '\u00EC': continue; 
            case '\u00ED': continue; 
            case '\u00EE': continue; 
            case '\u00EF': continue; 
            case '\u00F0': continue; 
            case '\u00F1': continue; 
            case '\u00F2': continue; 
            case '\u00F3': continue; 
            case '\u00F4': continue; 
            case '\u00F5': continue; 
            case '\u00F6': continue; 
            case '\u00F8': continue; 
            case '\u00F9': continue; 
            case '\u00FA': continue; 
            case '\u00FB': continue; 
            case '\u00FC': continue; 
            case '\u00FD': continue; 
            case '\u00FE': continue; 
            case '\u00FF': continue;        
        }
        return false;     
    }    return true; // empty string is true    
}

In very quick testing on a corpus of words with about 60% pass rate I get about a factor of 8 speed up with this approach.

It's not actually that much less readable than the regex without the escape characters either!

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