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I would like to write a regular expression in Java to match a sequence of word characters and spaces followed by the sequence of characters "subclass of" a sequence of word characters and spaces:

Example strings which should be matched:

a subclass of b

a and b subclass of c

a and b subclass of c and d

The following strings should not be matched:

subclass of

a subclass of

subclass of b

a subclass of b subclass of c

I tried the following regex:

    [a-zA-Z0-9 ]+subclass of[a-zA-Z0-9 ]+

(?:(?!subclass of).)+subclass of(?:(?!subclass of).)+

but they both fall short of what I need.

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2  
Good Thinking. You should sure write it. But what should we do? Do you have any problem with that? –  Rohit Jain Oct 25 '12 at 16:47
    
Could you tell us more about "general rule" of your regex? It may also help you write it all by yourself :) –  Pshemo Oct 25 '12 at 16:51
    
let me edit the question to explain better what I want. –  PB_MLT Oct 25 '12 at 16:53
    
This is a good reference: Pattern (Java). Once you build your pattern from it, you can just do "string".matches("pattern") (substitute with variable/s). –  ADTC Oct 25 '12 at 16:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use this regex:

^\\w+(?:\\s+and\\s+\\w+)?\\s+subclass\\s+of\\s+\\w+(?:\\s+and\\s+\\w+)?$

Here is the Live Demo:

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I'd make a little bit modification of your regex @anubhava:

^\w+(?:\sand\s\w+)*\ssubclass\sof\s\w+(?:\sand\s\w+)*$

To make sure that the group of (and \w+) can be matched more than once.

Live demo: here

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Btw if you want to backreference the optional classes, you would add a \s? at the end of the second group. –  Javier Diaz Oct 25 '12 at 17:37

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