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Here's a simple example:

def abc
    puts 'abc'
end

class Foo
    def self.bar
        abc
    end
end

Foo.bar

This breaks because abc is undefined inside Foo.bar. Is there a way to tell the class to "inherit" the local binding to make the above work? I'm basically trying to create a simple namespace for the "bar" method.

My first attempt was to subclass from the current eigenclass (class Foo < (class << self; self; end)) but you can't subclass a virtual class. Also, while I could explicitly pass in the binding and use eval inside, but that's not what I'm looking for.

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Is that code running at the top level, or is there some context you're leaving out? If it's top-level code, there should be no error, and that should print 'abc'. See this question and answer for a bit of why: stackoverflow.com/questions/1761148/… –  duelin markers Oct 25 '12 at 17:45
    
@duelinmarkers, you're right. I am running within a context, and thought this would be a minimal case, but it's different. Since I was confused, I'm going to flag this question for deletion. –  Ben Lee Oct 25 '12 at 17:49
    
@Ben I found your question interesting, replicated the code in IRB, and found, like @duelin that there is no error. If it does fail in the context, perhaps instead of deleting it, you could provide some context? $ irb 1.9.3p286 :001 > def abc 1.9.3p286 :002?> puts 'abc' 1.9.3p286 :003?> end => nil 1.9.3p286 :004 > class Fee 1.9.3p286 :005?> def self.bar 1.9.3p286 :006?> abc 1.9.3p286 :007?> end 1.9.3p286 :008?> end => nil 1.9.3p286 :009 > Fee.bar abc => nil –  Dmitri Oct 25 '12 at 17:54
    
@Dmitri, the issue is much more complex than this, it would be a completely different question. –  Ben Lee Oct 25 '12 at 18:26
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This breaks because abc is undefined inside Foo.bar.

No, it doesn't. abc is implicitly defined as a private instance method of Object and since a class IS-A Object, you can call it just fine. The code you posted should work as-is, and indeed does work for me.

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Thank you. Someone pointed this out in the comments hours ago, right after I posted the question, and I was hoping someone would actually post this as answer so I could give them the checkmark :) –  Ben Lee Oct 26 '12 at 1:19
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How about this

but I generally dont advice to do it myself though

def abc
    puts 'abc'
end

class Foo
    def self.bar
        eval("abc",TOPLEVEL_BINDING)
    end
end

Foo.bar
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If all you need is a simple namespace, can you use a module?

def abc
  puts 'abc'
end

module Foo
  def self.bar
    abc
  end
end

Foo.bar #=> abc
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