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I need to implement a loop where I have to ask the user, and then check the validity of the input (in this case it is necessary to print that is an invalid number). What is the better way to implement it?

Our programming professor does not let us use break, and for(;;) since, as he says, it is a bad practice. Is that correct?

Example 1:

int i = 0;

while(i == 0) {
  cout << "...: ";
  cin >> i;

  /*... Loop body ...*/

  if (i == 0)
    cout << "Not a valid number" << endl;
}

Example 2:

int i = 0;

do {
  cout << "...: ";
  cin >> i;

  /*... Loop body ...*/

  if (i == 0)
    cout << "Not a valid number" << endl;

} while (i == 0) // Better while(true) and use break ?

Example 3:

int i = 0;

for ( ;; ) {
  cout << "...: ";
  cin >> i;

  /*... Loop body ...*/

  if (i == 0)
    cout << "Not a valid number" << endl;
  else
    break;
}
share|improve this question
9  
Breaks aren't a bad practice... But for(;;) loops probably are. –  Shmiddty Oct 25 '12 at 17:33
3  
for(;;) is not as clear as while (true). And break should be avoided unless you really need it or the code is cleaner with break. –  nhahtdh Oct 25 '12 at 17:33
2  
@DanielFischer: I would disagree with you when there are actually some code in the loop. –  nhahtdh Oct 25 '12 at 17:36
7  
I would love to see your "professor's" switch() blocks if he's so anti-break. I'm not saying this is gospel, but it is more often-than-not correct. Proffs have brilliant ideas when it comes to algorithms, but easily some of the worst coding skills I've ever seen. That said, re:your question, since you're required to have at least one input cycle, I'd go with option2. –  WhozCraig Oct 25 '12 at 17:37
4  
Using for(;;) to implement an "infinite loop" has been idiomatic for decades. It's even in the original K&R book. Any C or C++ programmer should immediately understand it and not be confused. –  Blastfurnace Oct 25 '12 at 18:01

4 Answers 4

In your case the second construct (do..while) is the most intuititve for the reader to look at what the code does, and this is important.

The first one isn't so bad, the last one is poor a "for" construct is usually used where there are a limited number of iterations with the limit set in advance. It doesn't have to be, but intuitively that is how a for loop is used.

(Incidentally if the user entered a string that isn't a number you would have to clear the fail flag on cin, but that is not really the question being asked here).

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Don't you need to accept zero as an integer? It's good practice to not rely on input numbers having a special meaning.

If the meaning of the loop is to loop infinitely until the task is done there's nothing wrong with clearly saying while(true). I would probably do something more like this (requires C++11): (or use boost lexical_cast)

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <stdexcept>

int infini_asker(){
  while (true) {
    std::cout << "...: ";
    std::string tmp;
    std::cin >> tmp;
    int i;
    try{
      i=std::stoi(tmp);
    }catch(std::invalid_argument){
      continue;
    }catch(std::out_of_range){
      continue;
    }
    return i;
  } 
}

int main(){
  int num=infini_asker();
  std::cout << " got:" <<num << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for rigor lol but I see your point –  im so confused Oct 25 '12 at 17:59

A modification of Example 1 looks to be the best form:

while(true) {
    cout << "...: ";
    cin >> i;

    /*... other stuff ...*/

    // Do your input validation here:
    // Note that it's much better to whitelist what is
    // acceptable input as opposed to checking all of the
    // possible cases of invalid input
    if (...) { // where .. is the condition for valid input
        break
    } 
}

do-while loops should be reserved for special cases where you want to get the point across that the nested logic should be executed at least once. Anything you can do with do-while, you can do with while(...)

for(;;) is less familiar syntax for a lot of programmers (I didn't know what it meant a year ago), whereas while(true) is much more obvious.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is what I'd do. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 25 '12 at 18:08
    
I think you've sort of contradicted yourself here where you state that the "do-while loops...executed at least once" which i agree with 100%. And his problem states that he must ask the user for input and then check for validity. In that case, why did you not choose the do-while idiom? –  im so confused Oct 25 '12 at 18:43
    
@AK4749 That is an interpretation problem. I would interpret it as "Keep prompting for input until user gives correct input". This is consistent with industry practice - I can't cite a study right now, but from experience while(...) loops are used much frequently than do-while(...) even for cmdline-prompts. –  sampson-chen Oct 25 '12 at 19:11

They all work. Like Shmiddty says a for(;;) is not a good programming habit. I would do it like example 2, but I am not a professional programmer.

share|improve this answer
    
haha If only you'd seen "professional" code, you'd be more confident of your answer –  im so confused Oct 25 '12 at 17:37
    
@AK4749 Amen to that. –  WhozCraig Oct 25 '12 at 17:44
1  
no. 0 is a valid integer. –  Johan Lundberg Oct 25 '12 at 17:51
    
@JohanLundberg I...think that would be more of a design requirement rather than strict mathematical adherence, no? I can't tell if you're joking or not –  im so confused Oct 25 '12 at 17:55
1  
why would I be? All those suggested solutions requires a magical number, in this case zero. –  Johan Lundberg Oct 25 '12 at 17:56

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