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If I define an object like a logger object as static in a class, then call a method like the following:

public class Manager
{    
    private static ClientLogManager log = new ClientLogManager();

    public void Log(string Message)
    {
         log.Debug(string Message);
    }
}

This is defined in a class library project.

My understanding is that the static variable is shared between all requests for this application, so the log object is shared. However the method Debug itself is not static, but the object is static, so there will be only one instance of this method. Is that correct?

If a lot of users are calling this code at the same time, if 2 requests are calling the log.Debug method at the same time, can the message of the 2nd request overwrite the message of the 1st request?

Also, is it better to replace this with a Singleton? wouldn't it be one Singleton object per request?

Here is the ClientLogManager code

  public class ClientLogManager
    {
        #region Member Variables

        private static readonly ILog _log = LogManager.GetLogger(typeof(ClientLogManager));

        #endregion

        #region Constructors

        public ClientLogManager()
        {

        }

        #endregion

        #region Public Methods

        public void Debug(string message)
        {
            _log.Debug(message);
        }

        #endregion
    }
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If a lot of users are calling this code at the same time, if 2 requests are calling the log.Debug method at the same time, can the message of the 2nd request overwrite the message of the 1st request?

Yes, unless the logger is specifically written to support this. Most loggers are designed to support this, so unless you rolled your own from scratch chances are it will synchronize all writes internally (so that you don't have to). If you are unsure you should check the documentation for the specific logger you are using to see if it will support or break when written to simultaneously.

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"My understanding is that the static variable is shared between all requests for this application, so the log object is shared." Correct, there exists only 1 instance of a static member per AppDomain.

"However the method Debug itself is not static, but the object is static, so there will be only one instance of this method. Is that correct?" The statement in itself is correct, but...

What it boils down to is this:

  • Both static and instance methods "exist" only once in memory, the difference is that a static method does not need an instance of the class it's declared on in order to be executed, whereas an instance method does.

  • If multiple requests can be handled concurrently, they have to be executed on different threads. Each thread has its own call stack, and if you use a thread to perform a method call on, the arguments passed to that method are placed on the call stack of that thread.

  • This means that, as long as the argument is either a valuetype (such as an int) or an immutable type (such as in this case, a string) it cannot be modified by another thread (because it is either not visible from another thread, or not modifyable). Hence, you don't have to worry that the messages get mixed up inside your Manager.Log() or ClientLogManager.Debug() method.

So, both your current Manager and ClientLogManager implementations are thread-safe (at least, if the _log instance is thread-safe).

Once you start declaring non-static member variables in your Manager class, and you're going to use them in Manager.Log(), then it is no longer thread-safe: The same Manager instance could then be accessed by multiple threads, and once they all start writing in the same member variable, you're in trouble...

I hope this clarifies things a bit.

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