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I've always understood that strtok should be regarded with caution due to the fact that it modifies its input string by inserting NULLs at the last token locations. This is also validated by cppreference.

However, on trying to validate an example from cplusplus.com, I found that in VS2010 in 32 bit Windows 7, strtok is in fact NOT inserting NULLs in the original string. I was able to determine this by modifying the NULL in the argument from the example to str, and the program loops repeatedly, passing "This" as the token, which (as I interpreted this), is not the same behavior as passing the previous pointer, as cppreference claims.

In addition, I thought maybe the const-ness of string literals may have been at fault, so I copied the string

char str2[] ="- This, a sample string.";
char str[50];
strcpy(str,str2);

and ran it again, but the loop repeated. Debugger shows that the input string is not modified.

Can someone explain where I am going wrong here? edit: I think it's my interpretation of "The behavior is the same as if the previously stored pointer is passed as str."

Thank you.

EDIT: exact code:

/* strtok example */
#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main ()
{
  char str2[] ="- This, a sample string.";
  char str[50];
  strcpy(str,str2);
  char * pch;
  printf ("Splitting string \"%s\" into tokens:\n",str);
  pch = strtok (str," ,.-");
  while (pch != NULL)
  {
    printf ("%s\n",pch);
    pch = strtok (str, " ,.-");
    printf("%s\n", str);
  }
  std::cin.ignore();
  return 0;
}

Output from code:

Splitting string "- This, a sample string." into tokens:
This
- This
This
- This
This
- This
This
- This
This
- This
This
- This
This
- This

EDIT: RESOLVED Should I delete this garbage or let it stay? haha I don't want to take points away from the poor people who had to deal with this

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@nos good call thanks, debated making the post seem longer than necessary as the example was the second link I posted –  im so confused Oct 25 '12 at 19:23
    
So? You posted the code. Fine. Now, what made you think the string was not modified? I don't see any attempts to analyze the value str in the code. How did you come to the conclusion it wasn't modified? –  AndreyT Oct 25 '12 at 19:24
    
@AndreyT ah sorry, I checked it in the debugger, would have posted images but imgur is blocked at work –  im so confused Oct 25 '12 at 19:26
    
The easiest way to check if the string was modified is to insert a printf("%s\n", str); inside the loop, after the call to strtok() –  nos Oct 25 '12 at 19:27
    
@AK4749: The string that you should watch for modifications is str. str will be modified by the first call to strtok. I assume that in the debugger you were mistakenly watching str2. –  AndreyT Oct 25 '12 at 19:28
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Firstly, it is not NULL that is inserted into the original string, it is a zero-character that is inserted. While I understand that this is probably what you wanted to say, it is still not a good idea to involve a well-known and completely unrelated macro NULL.

Secondly, if strtok fails inserting zero characters into the original string, it simply won't work as intended. For this reason I strongly believe that you somehow misinterpreted the results of your experiments. strtok does modify the input string even in VS2010 under 32 bit Windows 7.


The output from your code you posted clearly shows that the string was modified. The original value of str was "- This, a sample string.". The value of str printed from inside the loop is just "- This". The string got truncated specifically because strtok inserted a zero-character right after "- This" (more precisely, the , character got replaced with \0 character).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll fix that, I got caught up with NULL-character from the reference wording and forgot to carry that over. Yes, that was what I had assumed, can you see where I am going wrong in the example code? –  im so confused Oct 25 '12 at 19:27
    
@AK4749: To clarify, "NUL" (with one L) refers to the 0-byte at the end of the string, whereas "NULL" specifically refers to a null pointer (of any type). To avoid confusion, I generally avoid using NUL and refer to it as the 0-byte or the null terminator. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 25 '12 at 19:32
    
There we go, don't I feel silly, that was it hahaha I was looking for the '\0' in the wrong place lol....From the wording I somehow expected "T" to go NUL, which is obviously not correct. Thanks! –  im so confused Oct 25 '12 at 19:34
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I was able to determine this by modifying the NULL in the argument from the example to str, and the program loops repeatedly

It does this because when you pass in str (or a non-NULL pointer), strtok() starts over, so it will just tokenize what's now a single token (returning it over and over). That's the documented behavior when a non-NULL pointer is passed in to strtok().

When you pass in NULL as the first argument to strtok() that tells it to pick up where it left off last time (it keeps track of that state in a static variable somewhere, which is one of the problems with strtok()).

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From the strtok(3) documentation: "On the first call to strtok() the string to be parsed should be specified in str. In each subsequent call that should parse the same string, str should be NULL." Also note that strtok is not thread-safe or reentrant, so if you're working in a multithreaded program or could potentially be tokenizing multiple strings at once, use strtok_r instead. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 25 '12 at 19:31
    
Thanks guys, I figured it was something like that, –  im so confused Oct 25 '12 at 19:32
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