Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So here's the scenario I'm working with:

I've got a priority list currently represented as an ItemsControl/ListView, bound to an observable collection of priority items. I want to provide tightly visually constrained vertical dragging for element reordering.

So, no drag adorners, no horizontal movement, only vertical movement. When a list item moves past the midpoint of another item, it should "swap positions" through animation. I am sure this can be done by working with mousedown/mousemove on the containers themselves, and I'm sure render transforms can be applied to do this, but my ideal solution would have two components to it:

  1. The functionality could be attached as a WPF interactions behavior.

  2. The system would be MVVM friendly and not require any significant code behind.

Has this been done? Where can I find it? If it hasn't how could I go about putting all the bits together in order to do this?

EDIT: Bounty opened. Please direct questions to me via comments and I will reply as fast as possible.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Nov 6 '12 at 19:21

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I have something that does this, but it uses drag adorners. The adorner looks like the selected object, and the swap doesn't happen until the drop. Your idea would look really pretty though. –  Josh C. Oct 25 '12 at 22:10
    
I could start from that. Care to share? –  Firoso Oct 25 '12 at 22:17
    
Have you looked at the ReorderListbox in the WPF Bag of tricks? –  HighCore Nov 6 '12 at 19:04

2 Answers 2

And for the code...

Mark-up:

<AdornerDecorator Margin="5">
    <ListBox x:Name="_listBox" Width="300" 
              HorizontalAlignment="Left"
              ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Items}" 
          AllowDrop="True" Drop="listBox_Drop">
        <ListBox.ItemContainerStyle>
            <Style TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}">
                <EventSetter Event="ListBoxItem.DragOver"  Handler="listBoxItem_DragOver"/>
                <EventSetter Event="ListBoxItem.Drop" Handler="listBoxItem_Drop"/>
                <EventSetter Event="ListBoxItem.MouseMove" Handler="listBoxItem_MouseMove"/>
                <EventSetter Event="ListBoxItem.MouseDown" Handler="listBoxItem_MouseDown"/>
                <EventSetter Event="ListBoxItem.PreviewMouseDown" Handler="listBoxItem_MouseDown"/>
                <Setter Property="AllowDrop" Value="True"/>
            </Style>
        </ListBox.ItemContainerStyle>
    </ListBox>
</AdornerDecorator>

And the code-behind:

private bool _isDragging;

    private void listBox_MouseDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
    {
        _isDragging = false;
    }

    Adorner _adorner;

    private void listBox_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!_isDragging && e.LeftButton == MouseButtonState.Pressed)
        {
            _isDragging = true;

            if (_listBox.SelectedValue != null)
            {
                DragDrop.DoDragDrop(_listBox, _listBox.SelectedValue,
                   DragDropEffects.Move);
            }

        }
    }




private ListBoxItem FindlistBoxItem(DragEventArgs e)
    {
        var visualHitTest = VisualTreeHelper.HitTest(_listBox, e.GetPosition(_listBox)).VisualHit;

        ListBoxItem listBoxItem = null;

        while (visualHitTest != null)
        {
            if (visualHitTest is ListBoxItem)
            {
                listBoxItem = visualHitTest as ListBoxItem;

                break;
            }
            else if (visualHitTest == _listBox)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Found listBox instance");
                return null;
            }

            visualHitTest = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(visualHitTest);
        }

        return listBoxItem;
    }

    void ClearAdorner()
    {
        if (_adorner != null)
        {
            var adornerLayer = AdornerLayer.GetAdornerLayer(_listBox);
            adornerLayer.Remove(_adorner);
        }
    }

    private void listBox_DragOver(object sender, DragEventArgs e)
    {
        e.Effects = DragDropEffects.Move;

        ClearAdorner();

        var listBoxItem = FindlistBoxItem(e);

        if (listBoxItem == null || listBoxItem.DataContext == _listBox.SelectedItem) return;

        if (IsInFirstHalf(listBoxItem, e.GetPosition(listBoxItem)))
        {
            var adornerLayer = AdornerLayer.GetAdornerLayer(_listBox);
            _adorner = new DropBeforeAdorner(listBoxItem);
            adornerLayer.Add(_adorner);
        }
        else if (IsInLastHalf(listBoxItem, e.GetPosition(listBoxItem)))
        {
            var adornerLayer = AdornerLayer.GetAdornerLayer(_listBox);
            _adorner = new DropAfterAdorner(listBoxItem);
            adornerLayer.Add(_adorner);
        }

    }

    private void listBox_Drop(object sender, DragEventArgs e)
    {
        if (_isDragging)
        {
            _isDragging = false;
            ClearAdorner();

            var listBoxItem = FindlistBoxItem(e);

            if (listBoxItem == null || listBoxItem.DataContext == _listBox.SelectedItem) return;

            var drop = _listBox.SelectedItem as Export.Domain.Components.Component;
            var target = listBoxItem.DataContext as Export.Domain.Components.Component;

            var listBoxItem = GetlistBoxItemControl(listBoxItem);

            if (IsInFirstHalf(listBoxItem, e.GetPosition(listBoxItem)))
            {
                var vm = this.DataContext as ComponentlistBoxModel;
                vm.DropBefore(drop, target);
            }                
            else if (IsInLastHalf(listBoxItem, e.GetPosition(listBoxItem)))
            {
                var vm = this.DataContext as ComponentlistBoxModel;
                vm.DropAfter(drop, target);
            }
        }
    }



    public static bool IsInFirstHalf(FrameworkElement container, Point mousePosition)
    {
        return mousePosition.Y < (container.ActualHeight/2);
    }

    public static bool IsInLastHalf(FrameworkElement container, Point mousePosition)
    {
        return mousePosition.Y > (container.ActualHeight/2);
    }

You may not like the fact that my code-behind concretely references the viewmodel by type, but it got the job done, and it was quick and easy, and technically it doesn't break the MVVM pattern. I still leave the logic to the viewmodel.

Addition 1 Animations will probably provide the effect you are looking for. In my implementation, the swap happens on drop. However, you could achieve an animated effect by using an adorner and making the swap happen on drag. The drag event would update the adorner location and the index of the object within the collection.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a useful answer but very non-generic and fails to address the original question sufficiently. –  Firoso Nov 3 '12 at 0:07
    
@Firoso I almost have the solution written for you. What more do you want? –  Josh C. Nov 3 '12 at 13:26
    
It's quite a bit different, has no visual for items "making room." And is as you pointed out, very use-case specific. It's not bad at all :D, but I think SO can do better. –  Firoso Nov 3 '12 at 15:57
    
@Firoso I've updated my answer. Give it another read and see if it doesn't cover your needs. –  Josh C. Nov 3 '12 at 17:00
    
Certainly a bit better. I'll see what I can do to adapt this into a behavior –  Firoso Nov 3 '12 at 17:51

Although i didn't come up with the solution myself, i have once came across a blog post that i think does exactly what you want with an excellent separation of concerns using attached properties and adorners. take a look at it here: ZagStudio. hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, see, this is BETWEEN component, and doesn't address the in-place drag re-positioning behavior. –  Firoso Nov 3 '12 at 15:55
    
@Firoso, if i understand correctly what you're saying, you want to re-arrange items in the same control. and the code can do that by setting both the attached IsDragSource and IsDropTarget properties to true on the same control. –  Sniffer Nov 3 '12 at 16:52
    
Right, but I want the visuals to be contained wholly within the original control, so items will only move vertically, they won't go outside the control's bounds and they won't go horizontally with the mouse. –  Firoso Nov 3 '12 at 17:46

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.