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I am having trouble reading numbers from a file into a 2d array in c++. It reads the first row just fine but the rest of the rows are populated with 0's. I have no idea what I'm doing wrong.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int myarray[20][20];

    int totRow = 20, totCol = 20, number, product, topProduct = 0, row, col, count;
    char element[4];

    ifstream file;

    file.open( "c:\\2020.txt" );

    if( !file )
    {
        cout << "problem";
        cin.clear();
        cin.ignore(255, '\n');
        cin.get();

        return 0;
    }

    while( file.good())
    {
        for( row = 0; row < totRow; row++ )
        {
            for( col = 0; col < totCol; col++ )
            {
                file.get( element, 4 );
                number = atoi( element );
                myarray[row][col] = number;
                cout << myarray[row][col] << " ";
            }
            cout << endl;

        }
        file.close();
    } 
share|improve this question
4  
what is the structure of 2020.txt ? – PW. Oct 25 '12 at 19:52
    
You could probably replace your entire while loop with std::copy_n( std::istream_iterator<int>( file ), 20*20, &myarray[0][0] );. – Robᵩ Oct 25 '12 at 19:59
    
@trumpetlicks - No, that will work even if he has newlines. - ideone.com/u3Ww8P – Robᵩ Oct 25 '12 at 20:01
    
@Robᵩ - Good to know, thanks for the info :-) – trumpetlicks Oct 25 '12 at 20:07

If there are only numbers in your file, you can just read them with the >> operator. Change your inner loop to:

for( col = 0; col < totCol; col++ )
{
    file >> myarray[row][col];
    cout << myarray[row][col] << " ";
}

The problem with file.get() is, it doesn't read beyond newline \n. See: std::basic_istream::get

share|improve this answer
1  
@trumpetlicks No, this doesn't matter. The >> operator skips whitespace before reading the integer. – Olaf Dietsche Oct 25 '12 at 20:00
    
@trumpetlicks Look at std::basic_istream::operator>> – Olaf Dietsche Oct 25 '12 at 20:11

You're closing the file inside the while loop:

while( file.good())
    {
        for( row = 0; row < totRow; row++ )
        {
            for( col = 0; col < totCol; col++ )
            {
                file.get( element, 4 );
                number = atoi( element );
                myarray[row][col] = number;
                cout << myarray[row][col] << " ";
            }
            cout << endl;

        }
        file.close();   // <------ HERE
    } // end of while loop is here

You obviously can't read from a closed stream. Now, because you're trying to read all the data in the first iteration of the while loop, this doesn't seem to be your immediate problem. Note however, that the stream can still be good() even after you've read all the meaningful data (for example if there's a traling new-line character) and in that case, you'll enter the loop for the second time. That's a bug.

share|improve this answer
1  
While not good form, Im not sure this is his ultimate problem. – trumpetlicks Oct 25 '12 at 19:57
    
@trumpetlicks My best guess, unless OP posts a sample input. – jrok Oct 25 '12 at 20:08
    
@jrok But outside the reading loop ;-) When the file is closed, he's already gone over the whole myarray. – Olaf Dietsche Oct 25 '12 at 20:10
    
@Olaf You're absolutely right, thanks for pointing that out. – jrok Oct 25 '12 at 20:13

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