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let's say I have this:

enum E{ 
a,
b,
c,
total
}

class A {
char mask; // supposed to contains combinations of values of the enum, like a or c, etc
}

Is there a decent solution to build the object A in a user-friendly way? For instance I could do:

A(E e) {
mask = 1 << e;
}

but this will only work if you want the mask to be made from only 1 element of the enum Ideally the user would be able to do something like :

A* a = new A(a | c)

and this would automatically create

mask = 1 << a | 1 << c;

Any idea on how to do this correctly? thanks

edit

sadly I have no control over the initial enum and the values are increasing 1 by 1

share|improve this question
    
Why do you do not have control over the initial enum as you are writing the class A? – Ed Heal Oct 25 '12 at 20:05
    
Don't use enums to specify bit values -- big headache. We just banished enums on our medical device product. If you must use enums, then let them represent the bit position and use 1 left shift to the quantity of the enum. – Thomas Matthews Oct 25 '12 at 21:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, there's the simple way and the ugly way.

The simple way is to define the bits as non-overlapping to being with, e.g.:

enum E
{ 
   a = 1 << 0,
   b = 1 << 1,
   c = 1 << 2,
   total = 1 << 3 // or a | b | c, not sure what the intent was
};

The ugly way:

#define MAKEA(x) (new A((E_helper() | x).get()))

where E_helper is a class that overrides operator|(enum E).

class E_helper
{
    unsigned accum;
public:
    explicit E_helper(unsigned initial = 0) : accum(initial) {}
    unsigned get() const { return accum; }
    E_helper operator|(enum E e) const { return E_helper(accum | (1 << (unsigned)e)); }
};

And then your user can say

A* p = MAKEA(a | c);

which expands to

A* p = (new A((A_helper() | a | c).get());

which causes this chain of events

A_helper.operator|(a).operator|(c).get()

Better yet, move the .get() call inside A's constructor, which then takes an argument of type A_helper. This will let you catch the case where the user forgot to use the MAKEA macro.

Be warned, however, that the ugly way exposes counter-intuitive behavior. For example, A* p = MAKEA(a | c); is different from A* p = MAKEA( (a | c) ); and char mask = a | c; A* p = MAKEA(mask);

share|improve this answer
    
please see the edit – lezebulon Oct 25 '12 at 20:00
    
@lezebulon: And see my expanded answer. – Ben Voigt Oct 25 '12 at 20:04
    
What about using a bitset? – Thomas Matthews Oct 25 '12 at 20:07
    
@Thomas: That would be useful if you need more than sizeof(unsigned)*CHAR_BIT flags. Because the question is using char mask, I don't think that's an issue. – Ben Voigt Oct 25 '12 at 20:10

In order to maintain types and also provide support for bitwise |, &, ^ I write the following operators in a macro and usually use them on enum types in my projects:

enum E {
    a = 1 << 0,
    b = 1 << 1,
    c = 1 << 2,
    total = a | b | c
};
E operator | (E lhs, E rhs ) {
    return static_cast<E>( static_cast<int>(lhs) | static_cast<int>(rhs) );
}
E operator & (E lhs, E rhs ) {
    return static_cast<E>( static_cast<int>(lhs) & static_cast<int>(rhs) );
}
E operator ^ (E lhs, E rhs ) {
    return static_cast<E>( static_cast<int>(lhs) ^ static_cast<int>(rhs) );
}
E operator ~ (E e ) {
    return static_cast<E>( ~static_cast<int>(e) );
}
E& operator |= (E& lhs, E rhs ) {
    return lhs = static_cast<E>( static_cast<int>(lhs) | static_cast<int>(rhs) );
}
E& operator &= (E& lhs, E rhs ) {
    return lhs = static_cast<E>( static_cast<int>(lhs) & static_cast<int>(rhs) );
}
E& operator ^= (E& lhs, E rhs ) {
    return lhs = static_cast<E>( static_cast<int>(lhs) ^ static_cast<int>(rhs) );
}

Now you may have:

void test( E e );
test( a | b );
E e = c;
e |= b;
e = e & d;
e ^= a;
e = ~e;
share|improve this answer

Try

enum E{ 
a = 1,
b = 2,
c = 4,

}

Then

A var(a | c)

will work

Then to check if (say) a is set you use & i.e. if (mask & a) ...

share|improve this answer
    
please see the edit – lezebulon Oct 25 '12 at 20:01

You need to generate bit masks from a set of contiguous values. That's straightforward:

int mask(E e) {
    return 1 << e;
}

Now you can or the mask values together to call your function:

A var(mask(a) | mask(b));
share|improve this answer

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