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Could someone help identify why my server cannot accept more than one message from the client?

I am attempting to have the flow be like the following:
1. Client sends size of message to server
2. Server receives the size and sends a response back. In this case 0.
3. Client checks response and then writes message to server.
4. Server reads message and prints it out.

The problem I am getting is that the accept() at step 4 is never unblocking.

CLIENT

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
int sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

struct sockaddr_in s_address;
s_address.sin_family = AF_INET;
s_address.sin_port = htons(51717);
s_address.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
if (connect(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &s_address, sizeof(s_address)) < 0) {
    printf("ERROR: Cannot connect()\n");
    exit(0);
}

char *org_msg = "Hello";

printf("Writing size of Hello\n");
char msg1[1];
msg1[0] = sizeof(org_msg);
write(sock, msg1, sizeof(msg1));

printf("Waiting for response from server\n");
struct sockaddr_in c_address;
socklen_t c_length = sizeof(c_address);
int new_sock = accept(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &c_address, &c_length);

printf("Reading response from server\n");
char stat[1];
read(new_sock, stat, 1);

if (atoi(stat) == 0) {
    printf("Writing Hello to server\n");
    write(sock, org_msg, sizeof(org_msg));
}
close(sock);
close(new_sock);
}

SERVER

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
int sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

struct sockaddr_in s_address;
s_address.sin_family = AF_INET;
s_address.sin_port = htons(51717);
s_address.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
if (bind(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &s_address, sizeof(s_address)) < 0) {
    printf("ERROR: Cannot bind()\n");
    exit(0);
}

listen(sock, 3);

printf("Waiting for client message\n");
struct sockaddr_in c_address;
socklen_t c_length = sizeof(c_address);
int new_sock = accept(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &c_address, &c_length);

printf("Reading client message\n");
char msg[1];
read(new_sock, msg, 1);

printf("Writing response to client\n");
char stat[1];
stat[0] = '0';
write(new_sock, stat, sizeof(stat));

printf("Waiting for client message\n");
int new_sock2 = accept(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &c_address, &c_length);

printf("Reading client message\n");
char msg2[atoi(msg)];
read(new_sock2, msg2, sizeof(msg2));

printf("MESSAGE: %s\n", msg2);

close(sock);
close(new_sock);
close(new_sock2);
}
share|improve this question
1  
You need to put certain parts of your code in while loops! You're only accepting one connection on the server side. –  Florin Stingaciu Oct 25 '12 at 20:21
2  
(1) You really need to be checking the return results of your api-calls. (2) You need to develop a protocol that ensures the client, and server, properly know what data parts each has sent and received respectively. (3) if the server is planning on doing anything besides answering a single-client once, a service loop is likely in order. –  WhozCraig Oct 25 '12 at 20:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should not call accept() on an already-connected socket. Once you have a connected socket in the server (the socket returned by accept()) you should just keep reading and writing that socket until the connection is closed. The steps for the server should be similar to:

listen_socket = socket(...);
listen(listen_socket, ...);
connected_socket = accept(listen_socket, ...);
read(connected_socket, ...)
write(connected_socket, ...)
read(connected_socket, ...)
write(connected_socket, ...)
...

Similarly the client should just keep reading and writing the socket once it has been connected successfully - the steps for the client should be:

connected_socket = socket(...);
connect(connected_socket, ...);
write(connected_socket, ...);
read(connected_socket, ...);
write(connected_socket, ...);
read(connected_socket, ...);
...
share|improve this answer

INADDR_ANY works in the server but your client needs to specify what host it's connecting to.

If both are on the same machine, just use 127.0.0.1 or localhost (you'll have to do a transform so that it's the right format)

More information here, but a short answer would be

#define INADDR_LOOPBACK 0x7f000001

and then s_address.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl (INADDR_LOOPBACK)

share|improve this answer
    
This does not seem to solve my problem. My second "Waiting for client message" still does not unblock. –  Takkun Oct 25 '12 at 20:26
2  
Because you shouldn't accept twice. accept once and then read from that socket - as mentioned in comments to your OP, after the accept you should have a loop that encapsulates your read/write pairs. –  KevinDTimm Oct 25 '12 at 20:29
    
If I can't accept twice, how can the server block and wait for a second response from the client after sending the 0 status code. –  Takkun Oct 25 '12 at 20:46
    
do another read (really, loop with alternating read/write) –  KevinDTimm Oct 25 '12 at 21:00

On the client you try to accept a new connection with the socket you previously connected to the server, which will be bound to a system-chosen port number. The server never tries to connect to the client, so the accept call on the client never returns (actually it may return but with an error, because you never call listen on that socket).

Why not just perform step 3 with the same socket used in the previous steps? If for some reason you do need a new socket, you should create a new socket in the client instead of reusing the previous socket (or call close on the previous socket and then call connect on it again).

BTW if all you need is IPC, sockets are a really bad way to do it. I suggest something like Java RMI.

share|improve this answer

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