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i have align section tag to left and aside tag to right in css3.it is working in google chrome. but it is not working in firefox and internet explorer.can someone tell why is not working. here html5 code

<!DOCTYPE html >
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="urf-8" />
<title>Bruno Website </title>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="main.css" >
</head>

<body>
    <div id=big_wrapper>
    <header id="top_header">
       <h1> Welcome to HTML5 </h1>
    </header>

    <nav id="top_menu">
        <ul>
            <li>Home</li>
            <li>Services</li>  
            <li>Tutorials</li>  
            <li>Conatct</li>        
        </ul>
    </nav>

    <div id="new_div">
    <section id="main_section">
        <article>
            <header>
                <hgroup>
                <h1>Tiltle of the article</h1>
                <h2>titile h2 </h2>
                </hgroup>
            </header>
                <p>This is my First Website in hTml5 </p>
            <footer>
                 <p>~BRuno thileeban</p>
            </footer>
        </article>
        <article>
            <header>
                <hgroup>
                <h1>Tiltle of the article2</h1>
                <h2>titile h2 2 </h2>
                </hgroup>
            </header>
                <p>This is my First Website in hTml5 2 </p>
            <footer>
                <p>~BRuno thileeban</p>
            </footer>
        </article>
    </section>
        <aside id="side_news">
            <h4>News</h4>
            HEllo we r doing good job
        </aside>
    </div>
    <footer id="the_footer">
    Copyright Bruno .....
    </footer>

    </div>
</body>

</html>

Here is the css3 code

*
{ 
margin:0px;
padding:0px;
}
h1
{
 font: bold 20px Tahoma;
}
h2
{
font: bold 14px Tahoma;
}
header, section, footer, aside, nav, article, hgroup{ display:block;}
body
{
 width:100%;
 display:-webkit-box;
 -webkit-box-pack: center;
}
#big_wrapper{
 max-width: 1000px;
 margin:20px 0px;
 display:-webkit-box;
-webkit-box-orient: vertical;
-webkit-box-flex:1;
}
#top_header { background:yellow;
border:3px solid black;
padding:20px;
}
#top_menu{ border:red;
background:blue;
color:white;
}
#top_menu li { 
display:inline-block;
list-style:none;
padding:5px;
font:bold 14px tahoma;
 }
 #new_div{ 
  display:-webkit-box;
  -webkit-box-orient:horizontal;
  }
  #main_section
  {
  border:1px solid blue;
  -webkit-box-flex:1;
  margin:20px ;
  padding:20px;

  }

  #side_news{
    border:1px solid red;
    margin:20px 0px;
    padding:30px;
    background: #66CCCC;

  }
  #the_footer{
  text-align:center;

   padding:20px;
   border-top:2px solid green;
  }
  article{ background:#FFFBCC; border:1px solid red; padding:20px; margin-bottom:15px;}
  article footer{ text-align:right;}
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've chosen to only support webkit (upon which Google Chrome is based) in your code. To support rendering engines used by other browsers you need to make some changes.

Everywhere you use -webkit-*, copy that line and below use -moz-*, again with -o-* and -ms-*, and then one more time without any prefix. The web browser will drop the ones it doesn't understand.

For example, -webkit-box-flex:1; becomes

-webkit-box-flex:1; /* chrome, safari, etc */
-moz-box-flex:1;    /* Firefox, seamonkey etc */
-o-box-flex:1;      /* Opera */
-ms-box-flex:1;     /* MSIE */
box-flex:1;         /* Any that support full implementation */

However, it should be noted that this is a property of the original CSS Flexible Box Layout Module standard which is being replaced by a new standard. You may be interested in using flex instead

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Vendor prefixes, by definition, are only supposed to work in a single vendor's browser as they indicate custom rules or experimental implementations of things which are not yet standardized (although there has been some controversy over that).

The -webkit- bit is a vendor prefix which will only apply to browsers which use the WebKit rendering engine, the most popular of which are Chrome and Safari. Here is a list of known vendor prefixes for other rendering engines. So if you take this rule:

body {
    width:100%;
    display: -webkit-box;
    -webkit-box-pack: center;
}

What you have is not really CSS3, but WebKit custom CSS. CSS3, if the rules and properties you're using get approved would look like this (do not use this code):

body {
    width: 100%;
    display: box;
    box-pack: center;
}

This rule will not work in browsers until the standard for box and box-pack is agreed and finalised, to get maximum current support your rule would have to look like this (again, do not use this code):

body {
    width:100%;
    display: -webkit-box;
    display: -moz-box;
    display: -ms-box;
    display: -o-box;
    display: box;
    -webkit-box-pack: center;
    -moz-box-pack: center;
    -ms-box-pack: center;
    -o-box-pack: center;
    box-pack: center;
}

This complexity is why people use tools like Compass to generate their stylesheets.

However, I've been saying all along that you should not use this code and the reason for that is there are no longer any plans to have box and box-pack in CSS3. They have been superseded by a new approach using the flex keyword. Although flex replaces box they do not work in quite the same way so it is not a direct translation. Support for vendor prefixed box attributes will either fade out or return to being custom CSS (the entire box approach started off as custom CSS that Firefox used to layout UI elements in the browser toolbars, ie. not for web pages at all).

This is the risk you run by using vendor prefixed CSS rules - the behaviour and even the syntax is liable to change. If you intend to use them you must stay on top of the spec as well as carefully monitor the progress of experimental implementations in browsers.

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You seem only to have used -webkit prefixes, which are specific to webkit based browsers such as safari and chrome, either use the other prefixes (-moz, -o), or use Compass, which is very useful for maintaining prefixes, as the code always reflects the latest browser support.

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You have used several -webkit prefixes in your CSS (Example: -webkit-box-orient: vertical;). These specifications only work in some browsers, notably Chrome.

Standard CSS prefixes like float would be a better option.

PS - There's no such charset as urf-8.

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