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I have an ant build script that builds many android projects.

I am building all the projects in a specific order given to me by a property in a text file.

The ant build script calls each project's own build.xml file to build that project.

If a project fails to build, how could i have ant continue to build from where it stopped because of the error?

Basically if i am building projects A, B, C, D and E. And the build process fails at C, what could i do to have the build process continue at C, when the developer starts the build again?

Also, the build process would need to rebuild stuff that was changed by the developer. For instance, the problem in C was because of an issue in A, and C depends on A. So, it would need to rebuild A, skip B, and rebuild C and continue. o.O

Looking for ideas or if there is already something that does this.

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

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Ant, like Make, is pretty good at figuring out where to continue when you left off. The <javac> task won't recompile code unless the source is updated. The <copy> task won't recopy a file by default. However, if you break up your build into multiple files, and then use <ant> tasks instead of using the depends parameter of your <target>, you will break this system.

Let's say you have independent projects A, B, C, and D. All your build.xml does is call the correct target in each one. Let's say each builds a jar file. And the process broke on project C because of a Java error. The developer fixed it. You run your build.xml again, and it will call projects A and B again. However, since these projects have already been built, they shouldn't be doing anything. You'll see the calls to A and B, but nothing will happen.

Even in project C, the build process will start where it left off. That is, if you didn't do anything to break Ant's ability to figure out its build.

There are many ways to break Ant. For example, don't delete files during the build process. If the target files are no longer there, Ant can't use timestamps to figure out what to do.

Sometimes, a process needs a little help for build avoidance. Ant has a built in <uptodate> task, but I find the <outofdate> much easier to use. For example, let's say that Project A produces a jar file that Project B uses. You might want to use one of these tasks not to copy that jar if the classfiles and resources used in the jar are older than the timestamp on the jar.

Otherwise, if you just blindly copied the jar to Project B, Project B will see that a file the classfiles depend upon has been updated. Thus, Project B will recompile everything. Then copy everything, and rebuild whatever jar or war it was building. I had a problem with a third party task that updated the Java classfiles directly, and had to use monitoring files to make sure I didn't run the compile twice or especially the task that munges the classfiles.

By the way, don't get upset at the targets Ant is saying it's executing. Ant will execute those targets, but the tasks that make up those targets won't run unless something was updated.


Update: Using <outofdate> From Ant-Contrib

Let's say in your Master project file, you have the following target:

<target name="build"
    description="Builds every sub project">
    <ant antfile=${project.a.dir}/build.xml target="build"/>
    <ant antfile=${project.b.dir}/build.xml target="build"/>
    <ant antfile=${project.c.dir}/build.xml target="build"/>
    <ant antfile=${project.d.dir}/build.xml target="build"/>

Use <outofdate>:

<target name="build"
    description="Builds every sub project">

    <outofdate>
       <sourcefiles>
           <fileset dir="${project.a.srcdir}"/>
       </sourcefiles>
       <targetfiles>
           <fileset dir="${project.a.dir}/target">
              <include name="*.jar"/>
           </fileset>
       </targetfiles>
       <sequential>
           <ant antfile=${project.a.dir}/build.xml
               target="build"/>
       </sequential>
    </outofdate>

    <outofdate>
       <sourcefiles>
           <fileset dir="${project.b.srcdir}"/>
       </sourcefiles>
       <targetfiles>
           <fileset dir="${project.a.dir}/target">
              <include name="*.jar"/>
           </fileset>
       </targetfiles>
       <sequential>
           <echo>CALLING PROJECT: ${project.b.dir}</echo>
           <ant antfile=${project.b.dir}/build.xml
               target="build"/>
       </sequential>
    </outofdate>

    <etc, etc, etc/>

If things are setup correctly, you could probably do the whole thing in an Ant-Contrib <for> loop, so you don't have to do this for each sub-project.

I don't know if this is any faster. The <outofdate> task still has to go through all of the files and do a date comparison, but at least you don't see it calling all the targets in your sub-project file.

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"However, if you break up your build into multiple files, and then use <ant> tasks instead of using the depends parameter of your <target>, you will break this system." I do not believe this is possible with our build process. We are building over 100 individual projects and each has their own build process. Their build process is auto generated by Android's provided utilities. I found some things i could change in my build process last night that got me closer to what i was wanting to achieve. Thanks –  prolink007 Oct 26 '12 at 13:20
    
@prolink007 It didn't sound like this was the issue you necessarily had, but it's common to see anyway. So I thought I'd mention it. In your system, it sounds like you have a master build.xml that calls sub-project's build.xml. That's fine. That's why I mentioned about copying artifacts between projects and not worrying if you do see project A rebuilding. If you did everything correctly, project A will quickly figure out everything is okay. –  David W. Oct 26 '12 at 13:41
    
It does, rather quickly, figure out that it does not have to do anything. But it does spend time doing stuff. I was hoping to prevent it from doing anything by just checking maybe one file instead of all the files. Oh well, looks like i am not going to get any more speed than i already have. Thanks –  prolink007 Oct 26 '12 at 14:42
    
Use the ant-contrib <outofdate> task to check whether to do a task. In your master build.xml, before you call a task in Project A's build.xml file, check whether whatever Project A is building (for example, a JAR file against the source. If it hasn't, skip the <ant> to Project A's build.xml file. –  David W. Oct 26 '12 at 15:34
    
@prolink007 - See the update in my answer. I don't think it will be any faster, but you won't see all the target calls in your sub project build files this say. –  David W. Oct 26 '12 at 15:48
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As far as possible, try and make your individual project builds idempotent (i.e. if you re-run the build and nothing's changed since last time then it doesn't have to rebuild everything). Standard tasks like javac and copy already work like this, for example javac only recompiles .java files that are newer than their corresponding .class. For cases that don't do their own dependency checking you can use the uptodate task to make the checks yourself. There's examples in the manual page for uptodate that show how to do this.

The idea is to get each build doing the minimum work it has to do in order to bring everything up to date. If you can achieve this then it doesn't matter if a rebuild of C causes A and B to run again, because they will complete very quickly if they don't actually have anything to do.

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I already knew the stuff about javac i was hoping for something that would not even call the targets for those builds when they were already built and not out of date. I have been looking into the uptodate thing to see if i could use it in some way to achieve my goal and may continue with uptodate. Thanks –  prolink007 Oct 26 '12 at 13:25
    
As David W mentioned in his answer, there's also the outofdate task from ant-contrib which can express some types of dependency more easily than the built in uptodate task. –  Ian Roberts Oct 26 '12 at 13:43
    
P.S. I've reversed your edit - an idempotent function is one where f(f(x)) = f(x), i.e. when you apply it twice in succession you get the same result as applying it once, it "doesn't do anything" the second time. –  Ian Roberts Oct 26 '12 at 13:45
    
Sorry, did not know that. Thanks. –  prolink007 Oct 26 '12 at 14:42
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