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I had to share this:

I got hung up for 2 full days on the following trivial error involving the Conditional Operator.

It's an easy correction, but I would like to know:

  1. Why did the buggy code compile?
  2. What was the bug doing?
  3. Why it was so damn hard to track down?

buggy code:

 std::map<int, some_class>   my_map;
int key_ctr = 0;
 //...
std::map<int, some_class>::iterator it_next   =  
                                            key_ctr == 0  ?
                                 it_next  =  my_map.begin()      // BUG!!!
                                 :
                                 it_next  =  --my_map.end();     // BUG!!!!

  // .....

Clearly, I wrote the Conditional Operator incorrectly. Eveyrthing works totally fine when I finally found and corrected this bug:

correct code:

 std::map<int, some_class>   my_map;
int key_ctr = 0;
 //...
std::map<int, some_class>::iterator it_next   =  
                                            key_ctr == 0  ?
                                 my_map.begin()              // CORRECTED!
                                 :
                                 --my_map.end();             // CORRECTED!

My program was just hanging when it got near the buggy part - as if it were in an infinite loop. When I ran it with valgrind, I got stuff like

....
==24570== Warning: set address range perms: large range [0x1a7731000, 0x1c5f79000) (defined)
==24570== Warning: set address range perms: large range [0x1c5f79000, 0x1e47c1000) (defined)
==24570== Warning: set address range perms: large range [0x1e47c1000, 0x203009000) (defined)
==24570== Warning: set address range perms: large range [0x203009000, 0x221851000) (defined)
.....
==3733== More than 10000000 total errors detected.  I'm not reporting any more.

Which was totally unhelpful and pointed me in the wrong director (I thought I was allocating too much on the heap, somehow).

Again,

  1. Why did the buggy code compile?
  2. What was the bug doing?
  3. Why it was so damn hard to track down?

Thanks kids.

share|improve this question
2  
The title is a bit misleading. The problem is not with the ternary operator, but with using an uninitialized variable. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 25 '12 at 20:53
    
Severe lack of parentheses diagnosed. No kidding. –  Deer Hunter Oct 25 '12 at 20:54
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas which is the uninitialized variable? –  john Oct 25 '12 at 20:55
    
@john just edited my answer to explain that. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 25 '12 at 20:58
2  
I love this part - "Why did the buggy code compile?". If you came up with a compiler that didn't compile buggy code, you'd be a billionaire. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 25 '12 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

1) The compiler only checks for syntax and a well-formed program. It's up to you to spot the logical bugs.

2) It's undefined behavior. And here's why:


whatever_non_POD_type it_next = condition ? it_next = whatever1 : 
                                            it_next  = whatever2; 

Actually, you can narrow it down to:

It it_next = it_next = whatever;

it doesn't really matter what whatever is. What matters is that until the full statement executes (; is reached), it_next is uninitialized. That's what the

It it_next = ...

part attempts to do. But first, it attempts to evaluate what's on the right hand side. Which is it_next = whatever. Which calls it_next.operator = (whatever). So you're calling a member function on an un-initialized object. Which is undefined behavior. Ta-da!!!

3) All undefined behavior is hard to track down. That's why you should at least be aware of common situations.

share|improve this answer
    
What undefined behavior? it_next is being assigned by both expressions in the ternary operator, and then a self assignment is being performed. I don't see the UB. –  Praetorian Oct 25 '12 at 20:57
    
@Praetorian explained. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 25 '12 at 20:59
1  
@LuchianGrigore Thanks for the explanation. This is really tricky. I'm not surprised the OP is feeling a bit aggrieved. It's the non-POD bit that had escaped me. –  john Oct 25 '12 at 21:00
    
Well, gcc also complains about int a = a = 10;. But in this case, the situation is a lot worse since the iterator is a UDT, and not a raw pointer (which is what I was thinking it was). –  Praetorian Oct 25 '12 at 21:07

3 Why it was so damn hard to track down?

Because you didn't have compiler warnings turned on?

$ g++ -std=c++0x -pedantic -Wall -Werror -g    m.cc   -o m
cc1plus: warnings being treated as errors
m.cc:10: error: operation on ‘it_next’ may be undefined
m.cc: In function ‘void __static_initialization_and_destruction_0(int, int)’:
m.cc:6: error: operation on ‘it_next’ may be undefined
make: *** [m] Error 1
share|improve this answer
1  
Wow excellent point @Robᵩ –  M.P. Oct 25 '12 at 21:15
    
Although, @Robᵩ, my program is fairly big and involves a large number of libraries. Thus, -Werror will cause warnings from external libraries (of which I have no control) to crash compilation. But I cannot fix these since they are in external libraries. –  M.P. Oct 25 '12 at 22:01
1  
@Matthew Clang has a wonderful -Wno-system-headers command line argument that makes it generate no warnings from files in any directory specified as -isystem /path/to/library. I wish other compilers have something like that. –  Claudio Oct 26 '12 at 17:35

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