Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am splitting sentences at individual space characters, and then matching these terms against keys of hashes. I am getting matches only if the terms are 100% similar, and I am struggling to find a perfect regex that could match several occurrences of the same word. Eg. Let us consider I have a term 'antagon' now it perfectly matches with the term 'antagon' but fails to match with antagonists, antagonistic or pre-antagonistic, hydro-antagonist etc. Also I need a regex to match occurrences of words like MCF-7 with MCF7 or MC-F7 silencing the effect of special characters and so on.

This is the code that I have till now; thr commented part is where I am struggling.

(Note: Terms in the hash are stemmed to root form of a word).

    use warnings;
    use strict;
    use Drug;
    use Stop;
    open IN,  "sample.txt"   or die "cannot find sample";
    open OUT, ">sample1.txt" or die "cannot find sample";

    while (<IN>) {
        chomp $_;
        my $flag = 0;
        my $line = lc $_;
        my @full = ();
        if ( $line =~ /<Sentence.*>(.*)<\/Sentence>/i ) {
            my $string = $1;
            chomp $string;
            $string =~ s/,/ , /g;
            $string =~ s/\./ \. /g;
            $string =~ s/;/ ; /g;
            $string =~ s/\(/ ( /g;
            $string =~ s/\)/ )/g;
            $string =~ s/\:/ : /g;
            $string =~ s/\::/ :: )/g;
            my @array = split / /, $string;

            foreach my $word (@array) {
                chomp $word;
                if ( $word =~ /\,|\;|\.|\(|\)/g ) {
                    push( @full, $word );
                }
                if ( $Stop_words{$word} ) {
                    push( @full, $word );
                }

                if ( $Values{$word} ) {
                    my $term = "<Drug>$word<\/Drug>";
                    push( @full, $term );
                }
                else {
                    push( @full, $word );
                }

                # if($word=~/.*\Q$Values{$word}\E/i)#Changed this
                # {
                # $term="<Drug>$word</$Drug>";
                # print $term,"\n";
                # push(@full,$term);
                # }
            }
        }
        my $mod_str = join( " ", @full );
        print OUT $mod_str, "\n";
    }
share|improve this question
    
You should try to make your question more concise. –  TLP Oct 25 '12 at 20:52
    
Provide your sample.txt please. Generally for your "special characters" case the easiest way is to simply strip them out of the input before you begin. –  didster Oct 25 '12 at 20:56
    
The sample.txt file is scientific text file, I cannot strip these characters as that would change meaning of few terms –  Pink Oct 25 '12 at 21:04
    
@TLP : Let let me know which part is not clear to you –  Pink Oct 25 '12 at 21:05
1  
@pink All of it. –  TLP Oct 25 '12 at 21:32
show 1 more comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I need a regex to match occurances of words like MCF-7 with MCF7 or MC-F7

The most straightforward approach is just to strip out the hyphenss i.e.

my $ignore_these = "[-_']"
$word =~ s{$ignore_these}{}g;

I am not sure what is stored in your Value hash, so its hard to tell what you expect to happen

if($word=~/.*\Q$Values{$word}\E/i)

However, the kind of thing I imagin you want is (simplified your code somewhat)

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use utf8;
use 5.10.0;
use Data::Dumper;

while (<>) {
    chomp $_;
    my $flag = 0;
    my $line = lc $_;
    my @full = ();
    if ( $line =~ /<Sentence.*>(.*)<\/Sentence>/i ) {
        my $string = $1;
        chomp $string;
        $string =~ s/([,\.;\(\)\:])/ $1 /g; # squished these together 
        $string =~ s/\:\:/ :: )/g;          # typo in original
        my @array = split /\s+/, $string;   # split on one /or more/ spaces

        foreach my $word (@array) {
            chomp $word;
                        my $term=$word;
                        my $word_chars = "[\\w\\-_']";
                        my $word_part  = "antagon";
                        if ($word =~ m{$word_chars*?$word_part$word_chars+}) {
                            $term="<Drug>$word</Drug>";
                        }
                        push(@full,$term); # push 

        }
    }
    my $mod_str = join( " ", @full );
        say "<Sentence>$mod_str</Sentence>";
}

This gives me the following output, which is my best guess at what you expect:

$ cat tmp.txt 
<Sentence>This in antagonizing the antagonist's antagonism pre-antagonistically.</Sentence>
$ cat tmp.txt | perl x.pl
<Sentence>this in <Drug>antagonizing</Drug> the <Drug>antagonist's</Drug> <Drug>antagonism</Drug> <Drug>pre-antagonistically</Drug> .</Sentence>
$ 
share|improve this answer
add comment
perl -ne '$things{$1}++while s/([^ ;.,!?]*?antagon[^ ;.,!?]++)//;END{print "$_\n" for sort keys %things}' FILENAME

If the file contains the following:

he was an antagonist
antagonize is a verb
why are you antagonizing her?
this is an alpha-antagonist

This will return:

alpha-antagonist
antagonist
antagonize
antagonizing

Below is the a regular (not one-liner) version:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
open my $in, "<", "sample.txt" or die "could not open sample.txt for reading!";
open my $out, ">", "sample1.txt" or die "could not open sample1.txt for writing!";

my %things;

while (<$in>){
    $things{$1}++ while s/([^ ;.,!?]*?antagon[^ ;.,!?]++)//
}

print $out "$_\n" for sort keys %things;
share|improve this answer
    
if($word=~/\b\Q$Values{$word}\E(\w++)\b/i) Matches everything –  Pink Oct 25 '12 at 21:23
    
Explain what you mean. I'm not sure what you want. I just updated my code some. I am about to make it handle commas and such correctly. –  protist Oct 25 '12 at 21:30
    
Can you update that in my code at the commented part?. What you explained above is exactly what I want. –  Pink Oct 25 '12 at 21:35
    
The code should work as intended now. I assumed you are running from a terminal that allows you to do perl -ne. You must replace FILENAME with the name of the file to examine. If you are not operating from a terminal to run the command as I have written, tell me and I will rewrite it in a different form. –  protist Oct 25 '12 at 21:39
    
I am not running from terminal. Please could you please update at the commented region. –  Pink Oct 25 '12 at 21:40
show 1 more comment

You may want to take another look at your assumptions on your approach. What it sounds like to me is that you are looking for words which are within a certain distance of a list of words. Take a look at the Levenshtein distance formula to see if this is something you want. Be aware, however, that computing this might take exponential time.

share|improve this answer
    
I am just trying to find a regex to match different form of same words, like if my hash key is synerg, it should match terms like synergistic, anti-synergy. –  Pink Oct 25 '12 at 21:03
    
Well, continuing from one of your original thoughts, you could strip out special characters with replacing every match of [^a-zA-Z0-9]+ with the empty string. Furthermore, you could do a search using your key (assuming your key might be the short/general version of what might be a longer word) against the string you're currently testing. If there is a match (key is in test string), then you've likely found an occurrence. –  Kyle Falconer Oct 25 '12 at 21:18
    
+1 for metioning the Levenshtein distance. I had good results for a different task using String::Compare. –  memowe Oct 25 '12 at 21:26
    
Striping terms or replacing say with spaces, will change the term meaning. Eg: MC-F7. If I do this MC will be one term while F7 would be other term. Which makes key from hash (MCF7) difficult to match –  Pink Oct 25 '12 at 21:26
    
Then regular expression are not the right tool for this task. –  memowe Oct 25 '12 at 21:29
show 4 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.