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I am trying to merge multiple linux commands in one line to perform deployment operation. For example

cd /my_folder
rm *.jar
svn co path to repo
mvn compile package install

I hope you guys will understand my question.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 107 down vote accepted

If you want to execute each command only if the previous one succeeded, then combine them using the && operator:

cd /my_folder && rm *.jar && svn co path to repo && mvn compile package install

If one of the commands fails, then all other commands following it won't be executed.

If you want to execute all commands regardless of whether the previous ones failed or not, separate them with semicolons:

cd /my_folder; rm *.jar; svn co path to repo; mvn compile package install

In your case, I think you want the first case where execution of the next command depends on the success of the previous one.

You can also put all commands in a script and execute that instead:

#! /bin/sh
cd /my_folder \
&& rm *.jar \
&& svn co path to repo \
&& mvn compile package install

(The backslashes at the end of the line are there to prevent the shell from thinking that the next line is a new command; if you omit the backslashes, you would need to write the whole command in a single line.)

Save that to a file, for example myscript, and make it executable:

chmod +x myscript

You can now execute that script like other programs on the machine. But if you don't place it inside a directory listed in your PATH environment variable (for example /usr/local/bin, or on some Linux distributions ~/bin), then you will need to specify the path to that script. If it's in the current directory, you execute it with:

./myscript

The commands in the script work the same way as the commands in the first example; the next command only executes if the previous one succeeded. For unconditional execution of all commands, simply list each command on its own line:

#! /bin/sh
cd /my_folder
rm *.jar
svn co path to repo
mvn compile package install
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1  
+1 for nice answer. –  Md. Mahbubur R. Aaman Sep 18 '13 at 4:21
    
+1. This is exactly what I was searching for ! –  Codename_DJ Apr 23 at 14:50
3  
For future readers: You can also use || instead of semicolon or && if you only want the next command to be executed if the last one failed. As in try this, and if it fails, try that. –  DeVadder May 7 at 14:55

I've found that using ; to separate commands only works in the foreground. eg :

cmd1; cmd2; cmd3 & - will only execute cmd3 in the background, whereas cmd1 && cmd2 && cmd3 & - will execute the entire chain in the background IF there are no errors.

To cater for unconditional execution, using parenthesis solves this :

(cmd1; cmd2; cmd3) & - will execute the chain of commands in the background, even if any step fails.

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You can separate your commands using a semi colon:

cd /my_folder;rm *.jar;svn co path to repo;mvn compile package install

Was that what you mean?

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cd /my_folder && rm *.jar && svn co path to repo && mvn compile package install
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it's not the same as the OP script, please explain : if a a command fails, the script abort –  sputnick Oct 25 '12 at 21:06
3  
Additionally, you can use cmd1 || cmd2 separator if you need cmd2 to execute only if cmd1 returned non-zero status to shell, and you may use cmd1 ; cmd2 if you want to run both commands irrespective of their return status. –  Victor Sorokin Oct 25 '12 at 21:08
    
@sputnick It should be, I just pasted it in and concatenated the commands with && –  Mark Stevens Oct 25 '12 at 21:08
2  
@MarkStevens It's a better implementation but it won't get to the same results as if the commands were run sequentially, I think that's what sputnick meant. –  andrux Oct 25 '12 at 21:11
1  
+1 andrux, that's it. –  sputnick Oct 25 '12 at 21:16

If you want to execute all the commands, whether the previous one executes or not, you can use semicolon (;) to separate the commands.

cd /my_folder; rm *.jar; svn co path to repo; mvn compile package install

If you want to execute the next command only if the previous command succeeds, then you can use && to separate the commands.

cd /my_folder && rm *.jar && svn co path to repo && mvn compile package install

In your case, the execution of consecutive commands seems to depend upon the previous commands, so use the second example i.e. use && to join the commands.

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When I tried to run 3 same commands but with different input values, they didn't start to run at the same time with &&, instead it worked with &, I don't know why, but if you encounter the same situation, try single &. BTW, my commands look like this:

#! /bin/sh
java mcgui.Main ExampleCaster 0 localhostsetup&
java mcgui.Main ExampleCaster 1 localhostsetup&
java mcgui.Main ExampleCaster 2 localhostsetup
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