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I would like to turn on/off 3 stars that represent a level of difficulty. I don't want to make usage of several if condition, would it be possible to do so by just using bitwise operation?

Let's say i have declared an enum like this:

enum 
{
    EASY = 0,
    MODERATE,
    CHALLENGING
} Difficulty;

I would like to find a bit operation that let me find which star to turn on or off:

e.g:

level 2 (challenging)
star 0 -> 1
star 1 -> 1
star 2 -> 1

level 1 (moderate)
star 0 -> 1
star 1 -> 1
star 2 -> 0

level 0 (easy)
star 0 -> 1
star 1 -> 0
star 2 -> 0
share|improve this question
    
the enum doesn't have to start at 0 if it is easier –  tiguero Oct 25 '12 at 21:13
    
The second star can't be turned on when the first is turned off, so you can just use a Difficulty variable. –  timvermeulen Oct 25 '12 at 21:15
    
@timjver u mean i don't need to use bitwise operation actually? –  tiguero Oct 25 '12 at 21:18
    
@tiguero why do you need bitwise operations at all? in your case it is just EASY, MODERATE or CHALLENGING, isn't it? But another thing if you want to have one bit per star and have different stars combinations, like 101 or 011 or 110, than yes you neet bits –  Ezeki Oct 25 '12 at 21:24
    
@Ezeki Yes you are right, but i have an other case to handle when the order won't matter so i wanted to practice a bit with bitwise operation –  tiguero Oct 25 '12 at 21:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You would want to do something like this:

typedef enum Difficulty : NSUInteger
{
    EASY = 1 << 0,
    MODERATE = 1 << 1,
    CHALLENGING = 1 << 2
} Difficulty;

And then to check it:

- (void) setStarsWithDifficulty:(Difficulty)diff
{
    star0 = (diff & (EASY | MODERATE | CHALLENGING));
    star1 = (diff & (MODERATE | CHALLENGING));
    star2 = (diff & CHALLENGING);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I validated this for the simplicity of ur answer –  tiguero Oct 25 '12 at 22:51
    
@Tobi congrats, you won! =) –  Ezeki Oct 25 '12 at 23:16

In the case if you want to have 3 bits to save your stars states, like instead of having three boolean flags, than you should do:

typedef enum 
{
    DifficultyEasy = 1 << 0,
    DifficultyModerate = 1 << 1,
    DifficultyChallenging = 1 << 2
} Difficulty;

Difficulty state = 0; // default

To set Easy:

state |= DifficultyEasy;

To add Challenging:

state |= DifficultyChallenging;

To reset Easy:

state &= ~DifficultyEasy;

To know is Challenging set:

BOOL isChallenging =  DifficultyChallenging & state;

In the case somebody needs an explanation how it works:

1 << x means set x bit to 1 (from right);
// actually it means move 0b00000001 left by x, but I said 'set' to simplify it 

1 << 5 = 0b00100000; 1 << 2 = 0b00000100; 1 << 0 = 0b00000001;

0b00001111 | 0b11000011 = 0b11001111 (0 | 0 = 0, 1 | 0 = 1, 1 | 1 = 1)

0b00001111 & 0b11000011 = 0b00000011 (0 & 0 = 0, 1 & 0 = 0, 1 & 1 = 1)

~0b00001111 = 0b11110000 (~0 = 1, ~1 = 0)
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You REALLY want to get that check mark don't you? :) –  Tobi Oct 25 '12 at 21:46
    
haha =) not at all, i just know that a lot of people don't understand this staff, so maybe they will find it useful later =) –  Ezeki Oct 25 '12 at 21:48
    
I know what you mean. :) Luckily (sadly?) opportunities to use this don't come up that often. –  Tobi Oct 25 '12 at 22:01
    
yeah, unfortunately... –  Ezeki Oct 25 '12 at 22:22
1  
This helped me out a lot, thanks for the great explanation! –  mikeytdan Sep 7 '13 at 6:51

Are you talking about something like:

star0 = 1
star1 = value & CHALLENGING || value & MODERATE
star2 = value & CHALLENGING
share|improve this answer
    
are u sure it is not | instead of || ? –  tiguero Oct 25 '12 at 22:01
    
Yeah, that's a regular OR expression. It's the same as value & (MODERATE | CHALLENGING) from @Tobi's answer. –  Nathan Villaescusa Oct 25 '12 at 22:02
#define STAR0 1
#define STAR1 2
#define STAR2 4

#define  EASY   STAR0
#define  MODERATE  STAR1|STAR0
#define  CHALLENGING STAR0|STAR1|STAR2

Detection a value d with and and compare against 0 will produce the required mapping, some of the above samples will give you the mapped value instead, take a look:

  int d = EASY;
  NSLog(@"Star 0 %d",(d&STAR0)!=0);
  NSLog(@"Star 1 %d",(d&STAR1)!=0);
  NSLog(@"Star 2 %d",(d&STAR2)!=0);
  d=MODERATE;
  NSLog(@"Star 0 %d",(d&STAR0)!=0);
  NSLog(@"Star 1 %d",(d&STAR1)!=0);
  NSLog(@"Star 2 %d",(d&STAR2)!=0);
  d=CHALLENGING;
  NSLog(@"Star 0 %d",(d&STAR0)!=0);
  NSLog(@"Star 1 %d",(d&STAR1)!=0);
  NSLog(@"Star 2 %d",(d&STAR2)!=0);
share|improve this answer
    
i hate macro - it is not compiler safe –  tiguero Oct 25 '12 at 21:41
    
good point, you are right. However, the result is the same. –  iOS Oct 25 '12 at 21:43

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