Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Write a program that prompts the user to enter an integer from 1 to 15 and displays a pyramid, as shown in the following sample run:

            1

          2 1 2

        3 2 1 2 3

      4 3 2 1 2 3 4 

    5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5

  6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

I have the following:

num = eval(raw_input("Enter an integer from 1 to 15: "))

if num < 16:

      for i in range(1, num + 1):
          # Print leading space
          for j in range(num -  i,  0,  -1):
               print(" "),
          # Print numbers      
          for j in range(i, 0, -1):
               print(j),
          for j in range(2, i + 1):
               print(j),
           print("") 
else: 
 print("The number you have entered is greater than 15.")

This yields a misalignment for numbers greater than or equal to 10.

I have tried print(format(j, "4d")) and all the numbers become misaligned.

Any tips? Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
You're probably looking for something such as str(j).rjust(2, ' ') or str(j).ljust(2, ' ') –  Thomas Orozco Oct 25 '12 at 21:28
1  
print the numbers in base 16 and they're all one digit. Alignment problems solved! –  Useless Oct 25 '12 at 21:40

5 Answers 5

Use a leading space for a number ("01" - "09", "10", ...)

num = eval(raw_input("Enter an integer from 1 to 15: "))                                                                                           

def as_str(i):
    s = ""
    if i <10: s = " "
    return s + str(i)


#num = 15                                                                                                                                           

allrows = ""
for j in range(1,num+2):

    #leading spaces                                                                                                                                 
    row = " "*3*(num-j+1)

    #backward                                                                                                                                       
    for i in range(j-1,1,-1):
        s = as_str(i)
        row+=s + " "

    #forward                                                                                                                                        
    for i in range(1,j):
        s = as_str(i)
        row+=s + " "


    row +="\n"
    allrows +=row

print allrows

Output

                                           1 
                                        2  1  2 
                                     3  2  1  2  3 
                                  4  3  2  1  2  3  4 
                               5  4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5 
                            6  5  4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5  6 
                         7  6  5  4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5  6  7 
                      8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8 
                   9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 
               10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 
            11 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 
         12 11 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 
      13 12 11 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 
share|improve this answer
    
Any suggestions without the use of strings? –  user1775527 Oct 25 '12 at 22:57

using string formatting, and it works for any value of n>=1:

num=int(raw_input())

max_width=len(" ".join(map(str,range(num,0,-1)))+" ".join(map(str,range(2,num+1))))+1
#max_width is the maximum width, i.e width of the last line

print "{0:^{1}}".format("1",max_width)      #print 1 , ^ is used to place the
                                            #string in the center of the max_width
for i in range(2,num+1):   #print rest of the numbers from 2 to num
    range1=range(i,0,-1)
    strs1=" ".join(map(str,range1))
    range2=range(2,i+1)
    strs2=" ".join(map(str,range2))
    print "{0:^{1}}".format(" ".join((strs1,strs2)),max_width) # use ^ again with max_width

outputs:

monty@monty-Aspire-5050:~$ python so27.py
5
        1        
      2 1 2      
    3 2 1 2 3    
  4 3 2 1 2 3 4  
5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5
monty@monty-Aspire-5050:~$ python so27.py
10
                   1                   
                 2 1 2                 
               3 2 1 2 3               
             4 3 2 1 2 3 4             
           5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5           
         6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6         
       7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7       
     8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8     
   9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9   
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
monty@monty-Aspire-5050:~$ python so27.py
20
                                                 1                                                 
                                               2 1 2                                               
                                             3 2 1 2 3                                             
                                           4 3 2 1 2 3 4                                           
                                         5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5                                         
                                       6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6                                       
                                     7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7                                     
                                   8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8                                   
                                 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9                                 
                              10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10                              
                           11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11                           
                        12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12                        
                     13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13                     
                  14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14                  
               15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15               
            16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16            
         17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17         
      18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18      
   19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19   
20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
share|improve this answer
    
any suggestions without the use of strings? –  user1775527 Oct 25 '12 at 22:57
    
@user1775527 do you mean without string formatting? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 25 '12 at 23:00
    
Yes. As is, is there anything small that can be added without string formatting? –  user1775527 Oct 25 '12 at 23:03

This is more compact solution:

num = eval(raw_input("Enter an integer from 1 to 15: "))                                                                                           
allrows = ""
for j in range(1,num+2):

    #leading spaces                                                                                                                                 
    formatter = lambda x: str(x).ljust(3)
    #shift to left
    row =  " "*4*(num+2-j)
    #count backward
    row+=" ".join(map(formatter, range(1,j)[-1::-1])) + " "
    #count forward
    row+= " ".join(map(formatter, range(2,j))) + '\n'
    allrows +=row

print allrows

This code outputs:

                                            1   
                                        2   1   2  
                                    3   2   1   2   3  
                                4   3   2   1   2   3   4  
                            5   4   3   2   1   2   3   4   5  
                        6   5   4   3   2   1   2   3   4   5   6  
                    7   6   5   4   3   2   1   2   3   4   5   6   7  
                8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8  
            9   8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  
        10  9   8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10 
    11  10  9   8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  11 
12  11  10  9   8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  11  12 
share|improve this answer
    
Any suggestions without the use of strings? –  user1775527 Oct 25 '12 at 22:58

This isn't a code golf entry, but it does show both bases. Note the decimal version has 3-space indentation, and the hex version only 2-space indentation.

def triangle(n):
    def indent(i):
        return ' '*3*(n-(i+1))
    def row(i):
        lhs = ['%2d' % j for j in range(i,0,-1)]
        rhs = lhs[:-1]
        rhs.reverse()
        return lhs+rhs
    rows = [indent(i)+' '.join(row(i)) for i in range(n)]
    return '\n'.join(rows)

def triangle_hex(n):
    def indent(i):
        return ' '*2*(n-(i+1))
    def row(i):
        lhs = ['%x' % j for j in range(i,0,-1)]
        rhs = lhs[:-1]
        rhs.reverse()
        return lhs+rhs
    rows = [indent(i)+' '.join(row(i)) for i in range(n)]
    return '\n'.join(rows)

if __name__=='__main__':
    print triangle(11)
    print triangle_hex(15)
share|improve this answer

num = eval(raw_input("Enter an integer from 1 to 15: "))

if num < 16:

for i in range(1, num + 1):
    # Print leading space
    for j in range(num -  i,  0,  -1):
        print("    "),
    # Print numbers      
    for j in range(i, 0, -1):
        print(format(j, "4d")),
    for j in range(2, i + 1):
        print(format(j, "4d")),
    print

else: print("The number you have entered is greater than 15.")

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.