Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have this Javascript code, which works as expected:

<div class="test"></div>

<script>
setTimeout(function(){$(".test").append("test1")},1000);
setTimeout(function(){$(".test").append("test2")},2000);
</script>
<script src="js/jquery.min.js"></script>

It shows "test1" first and then "test2" a second later, as such: "test1test2", which is what I want.

When I try to do this in a FOR loop, like this:

var timeInterval = 1000;
for (var i = 0, l = 2; i < l; i++ ) {
    setTimeout(function(){$(".test").append("test" + i)},timeInterval);
    timeInterval += 1000;
}

Then I get "test2" first and then "test2" a second later, as such: "test2test2", which is not what I want.

In fact, if l = 3, then I get "test3test3test3" instead of "test1test2test3". Does anybody know how to solve this problem?

share|improve this question
    
I think because the timeout is longer then the speed it is going through i, so by the time it evaluates i it is already at 3 – Scott Selby Oct 25 '12 at 21:51
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The var i is incremented to 2 when the setTimeout is executing the function and so it just prints the i value as 2 resulting in test2test2.

You should use a closure to use the instance of i which will print test1test.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/mBBJn/1/

var timeInterval = 1000;
for (var i = 0, l = 2; i < l; i++) {
    (function(i) {
        setTimeout(function() {
            $(".test").append("test" + (i+1))
        }, timeInterval);
        timeInterval += 1000;
    })(i);
}

Edit: used function args.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Vega. That worked! – Curt Oct 26 '12 at 1:10

The for loop doesn't create a new scope, you can use another function to do it:

var timeInterval = 1000;
for (var i = 0, l = 2; i < l; i++) {
    setTimeout((function(i) {
        return function() {
            $(".test").append("test" + i);
        }
    })(i), timeInterval);
    timeInterval += 1000;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Esailija. That worked as well. – Curt Oct 26 '12 at 1:12

The variable i will always refer to the current value of i (not the value of i when called) in this situation.

That's how scope works in JavaScript.

See the answer by @Esailija for a solution.

share|improve this answer

The most obvious way to keep i in scope is solved in other answers, but since you're using jQuery you have other options.

  1. Use $.each instead of for loop, that way you have access to i variable anywhere in that scope.

  2. Use delay instead of setTimeout. For this to work you need to trigger a queue first: $(".test").show(0).delay(timeInterval).append("test" + i)

share|improve this answer

This is because you aren't capturing the value of i from the for-loop. You can tweak your code to this to make it work:

var timeInterval = 1000;
for (var i = 0, l = 2; i < l; i++ ) {
    (function(i2, timeInterval2) {
        setTimeout(function() {
            $(".test").append("test" + i2);
        }, timeInterval2);
    })(i, timeInterval);
    timeInterval += 1000;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Cory for your suggestion. You need to remove one of the close brackets from: timeInterval)); to timeInterval); and it works. – Curt Oct 26 '12 at 1:14
    
@Curt: Good catch; edited, reformatted. – Cᴏʀʏ Oct 26 '12 at 13:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.