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I'm trying to run an external, separate program from Python. It wouldn't be a problem normally, but the program is a game, and has a Python interpreter built into it. When I use subprocess.Popen, it starts the separate program, but does so under the original program's Python instance, so that they share the first Python console. I can end the first program fine, but I would rather have separate consoles (mainly because I have the console start off hidden, but it gets shown when I start the program from Python with subprocess.POpen).

I would like it if I could start the second program wholly on its own, as though I just 'double-clicked on it'. Also, os.system won't work because I'm aiming for cross-platform compatibility, and that's only available on Windows.

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related: a slightly more complex problem keep multiple cmd windows open from batch –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 25 '12 at 23:38

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I would like it if I could start the second program wholly on its own, as though I just 'double-clicked on it'.

As of 2.7 and 3.3, Python doesn't have a cross-platform way to do this. A new shutil.open method may be added in the future (possibly not under that name); see http://bugs.python.org/issue3177 for details. But until then, you'll have to write your own code for each platform you care about.

Fortunately, what you're trying to do is simpler and less general than what shutil.open is ultimately hoped to provide, which means it's not that hard to code:

  • On OS X, there's a command called open that does exactly what you want: "The open command opens a file (or a directory or URL), just as if you had double-clicked the file's icon." So, you can just popen open /Applications/MyGame.app.
  • On Windows, the equivalent command is start, but unfortunately, that's part of the cmd.exe shell rather than a standalone program. Fortunately, Python comes with a function os.startfile that does the same thing, so just os.startfile(r'C:\Program Files\MyGame\MyGame.exe').
  • On FreeDesktop-compatible *nix systems (which includes most modern linux distros, etc.), there's a very similar command called xdg-open: "xdg-open opens a file or URL in the user's preferred application." Again, just popen xdg-open /usr/local/bin/mygame.
  • If you expect to run on other platforms, you'll need to do a bit of research to find the best equivalent. Otherwise, for anything besides Mac and Windows, I'd just try to popen xdg-open, and throw an error if that fails.

See http://pastebin.com/XVp46f7X for an (untested) example.

Note that this will only work to run something that actually can be double-clicked to launch in Finder/Explorer/Nautilus/etc. For example, if you try to launch './script.py', depending on your settings, it may just fire up a text editor with your script in it.

Also, on OS X, you want to run the .app bundle, not the UNIX executable inside it. (In some cases, launching a UNIX executable—whether inside an .app bundle or standalone—may work, but don't count on it.)

Also, keep in mind that launching a program this way is not the same as running it from the command line—in particular, it will inherit its environment, current directory/drive, etc. from the Windows/Launch Services/GNOME/KDE/etc. session, not from your terminal session. If you need more control over the child process, you will need to look at the documentation for open, xdg-open, and os.startfile and/or come up with a different solution.

Finally, just because open/xdg-open/os.startfile succeeds doesn't actually mean that the game started up properly. For example, if it launches and then crashes before it can even create a window, it'll still look like success to you.

You may want to look around PyPI for libraries that do what you want. http://pypi.python.org/pypi/desktop looks like a possibility.

Or you could look through the patches in issue 3177, and pick the one you like best. As far as I know, they're all pure Python, and you can easily just drop the added function in your own module instead of in os or shutil.

As a quick hack, you may be able to (ab)use webbrowser.open. "Note that on some platforms, trying to open a filename using this function, may work and start the operating system’s associated program. However, this is neither supported nor portable." In particular, IIRC, it will not work on OS X 10.5+. However, I believe that making a file: URL out of the filename actually does work on OS X and Windows, and also works on linux for most, but not all, configurations. If so, it may be good enough for a quick&dirty script. Just keep in mind that it's not documented to work, it may break for some of your users, it may break in the future, and it's explicitly considered abuse by the Python developers, so I wouldn't count on it for anything more serious. And it will have the same problems launching 'script.py' or 'Foo.app/Contents/MacOS/foo', passing env variables, etc. as the more correct method above.

Almost everything else in your question is both irrelevant and wrong:

It wouldn't be a problem normally, but the program is a game, and has a Python interpreter built into it.

That doesn't matter. If the game were writing to stdout from C code, it would do the exact same thing.

When I use subprocess.Popen, it starts the separate program, but does so under the original program's Python instance

No it doesn't. It starts an entirely new process, whose embedded Python interpreter is an entirely new instance of Python. You can verify that by, e.g., running a different version of Python than the game embeds.

so that they share the first Python console.

No they don't. They may share the same tty/cmd window, but that's not the same thing.

I can end the first program fine, but I would rather have separate consoles (mainly because I have the console start off hidden, but it gets shown when I start the program from Python with subprocess.POpen).

You could always pipe the child's stdout and stderr to, e.g., a logfile, which you could then view separately from the parent process's output, if you wanted to. But I think this is going off on a tangent that has nothing to do with what you actually care about.

Also, os.system won't work because I'm aiming for cross-platform compatibility, and that's only available on Windows.

Wrong; os.system is available on "Unix, Windows"--which is probably everywhere you care about. However, it won't work because it runs the child program in a subshell of your script, using the same tty. (And it's got lots of other problems—e.g., blocking until the child finishes.)

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it seems webbrowser module can automatically pick up xdg-open, open, startfile(). Though it is not obvious how to use them to run python scripts e.g., xdg-open script.py opens an editor while ./script.py in shell runs it. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 26 '12 at 0:19
    
Good point. I don't think the ./script.py case is pertinent here, because the OP is explicitly trying to open a game just as if he'd double-clicked it, but it's still worth mentioning. Also, webbrowser.open is definitely a hack, but it's worth discussing. So, I've updated the answer. –  abarnert Oct 26 '12 at 0:57
    
Thanks for the info, all of this stuff's good to check out. It's weird that there's no cross-platform way to simply start another separate program. Guess I'd have to use special cases for each OS. Anyway, thanks a lot! –  SolarLune Oct 27 '12 at 3:31
    
Well, if you read the comments in issue 3177, you can get an inkling of why it hasn't been implemented yet. It's difficult to design something even marginally more flexible than the lowest common denominator, to handle errors nicely, etc. It looks like we're going to get something eventually, but unless you're not planning to release your code until Python 3.4 or 3.5, that doesn't help you now… –  abarnert Oct 27 '12 at 4:50

When I use subprocess.Popen, it starts the separate program, but does so under the original program's Python instance...

Incorrect.

... so that they share the first Python console.

This is the crux of your problem. If you want it to run in another console then you must run another console and tell it to run your program instead.

... I'm aiming for cross-platform compatibility ...

Sorry, there's no cross-platform way to do it. You'll need to run the console/terminal appropriate for the platform.

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Really? That's odd, because the game I'm running is made in an engine that comes with Python (it's not written in Python), so running the game runs an instance of Python's console. If I run two instances of the game, each instance has its own separate Python console. There's no way to just call a separate program to be run? –  SolarLune Oct 25 '12 at 23:10
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This is all correct, but it's a somewhat hopeless and discouraging answer. It really is not hard to do this on all the platforms the OP is likely to care about, and you definitely do not want to do it by finding the right terminal program and running that. (For one thing, on *nix platforms, that won't even necessary open a new terminal window.) –  abarnert Oct 25 '12 at 23:28

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