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Here is my class:

public class AuditInfo
{
    public String ActionDescription { get; set; }
    public String ActionWho { get; set; }
    public BasicProjectProfile Project { get; set; }


    public AuditInfo ()
    { }

    public void SaveInfo ()
    {
        using (CIHEntities _dbContext = new CIHEntities())
        {
            AuditInfoEntity aie = new AuditInfoEntity();
            aie.ActionDescription = this.ActionDescription;
            aie.ActionWhen = DateTime.Now;
            if (this.ActionWho != null)
            {
                aie.ActionWho = this.ActionWho;
            }
            else
            {
                aie.ActionWho = "Not Specified";
            }
            aie.ProjectAssoc = _dbContext.ProjectEntity
                .Where(r => r.Id == this.Project.Id)
                .First();
            _dbContext.SaveChanges();
        }
    }
}

CIHEntities is a Entity Framework Database.

I would like to unit test the SaveInfo method but it shouldn't actually save to the Database. How Can this be done?

Thanks

Eric

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Please can you show me the interface for CIHEntities –  HatSoft Oct 25 '12 at 22:22
    
I've updated the post above. Thanks. –  user290043 Oct 26 '12 at 12:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

use the Repository pattern and move the responsibility for saving the enity to the Repository:

public class AuditInfo
{
    public String ActionDescription { get; set; }
    public String ActionWho { get; set; }
    public BasicProjectProfile Project { get; set; }
}

write an interface for your repository:

public interface IRepository
{
    void Save();
}

then your implemention:

public RealRepository : IRepository
{
    public void SaveInfo ()
    {
        using (CIHEntities _dbContext = new CIHEntities())
        {
            AuditInfoEntity aie = new AuditInfoEntity();
            aie.ActionDescription = this.ActionDescription;
            aie.ActionWhen = DateTime.Now;
            if (this.ActionWho != null)
            {
                aie.ActionWho = this.ActionWho;
            }
            else
            {
                aie.ActionWho = "Not Specified";
            }
            aie.ProjectAssoc = _dbContext.ProjectEntity
                .Where(r => r.Id == this.Project.Id)
                .First();
            _dbContext.SaveChanges();
        }
    }
}

then make your client code that takes a repository as a parameter will be something like this

public class MyClient{

    IRepository _repository;

    public MyClient(){
        _repository = new RealRepository();
    }

    public MyClient(IRepository repository)
    {
        _repository = repository;
    }

    public void Main(){
         AuditInfo entity = new AuditInfo();
         //do whatever you want
         _repository.Save();
    }
}

Your real application can use the default constructor which will use the RealRepository while you unit tests can can pass a Fake Repository implementation that doesn't talk to the database (or even better use a Mocking framework like Moq).

This is the basic concept, you can improve it to have a Generic Repository, use UoW pattern ... You can read more about it in this msdn article: Testability and EF

share|improve this answer
    
Kabaros, this is great. One question though, I am not sure I fully understand what is going on in the last code block MyClient. Would you add some explanation? Thanks!!! Eric –  user290043 Oct 26 '12 at 12:50
1  
Because your repositories implement the same interface IRepository, then you can use them interchangeably without the client (the calling code) being coupled to a specific implementation (polymorphism). So we are following the practice to "program to an interface" to loosen coupling between components. This helps you for example to change the implemnetation of RealRepository to use something other than EF without breaking the code that uses it. The parameterless constructor in MyClient is just for convenience, it's like saying RealRepository is the default repository if nothing is provided. –  kabaros Oct 26 '12 at 13:07
    
Ok, I think I got it now. So the last code block isn't an actual example that I should be using.... but rather, a 'template' on how to bring things together. I would then use the last code block to guide me in updating my public class AuditInfo –  user290043 Oct 26 '12 at 13:47
    
One other thing... my class then has to implement the IRepository interface, too. Right? I think that is missing from the example. –  user290043 Oct 26 '12 at 14:08
1  
and yes, it's not code you should be using, it is a template for code that will be acting as a "client" to your AuditInfo model and repository, so in your case, MyClient could be your webapplication or winforms/wpf application, any calling code .. but it should follow the same pattern as this sample code (i.e. having a repository passed into its constructor - taking that a step further will be using Dependency injection to pass the repository you want to use) –  kabaros Oct 26 '12 at 15:00
Given : that Id don't know what is the interface of CIHEntities
When : Unit Test is required for AuditInfo.SaveInfo
Then : inject the interface of CIHEntities from constructor of AuditInfo
Then : create a mock of CIHEntities from its interface and use it for Unit Test

Please mock the expectation and verify SaveChanges was called by using a mock library e.g Moq

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Use the TransactionScope. Unless you actually commit the changes, it won't be added to the database. That's what I use in my unit tests, and it works flawlessly.

To use it, you have to add a reference to System.Transactions, and after that you might get some Windows error. If I remember correctly, you have to start some Windows Service.. However, Google it when you get that far.

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