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On my website, I have a poll. It's cookie based poll. If a user votes, I create a cookie with the current poll, so he can't vote until a new poll is created. I know that the users can delete the cookies and vote again, but that is not the problem here.

I have a ajax.php page that handles the ajax post. Here is the code:

if(isset($_COOKIE['poll_id']) && $_COOKIE['poll_id'] == $poll_id)
{
// print message that it is already voted, show the results...
}
else
{
// update the database and create a cookie
}

This code works OK if the the voting is made on button click. But, I started a javascript in Firebug that is doing this:

for(var i=0;i<100;i++) {
    jQuery.post('ajax.php', {
        //post parameters
    });
}

And I get 100 votes. If i run the script again, it fails, because a cookie is created, but it seems that if I make a 100 simultaneous requests, the check fails, because I guess the system doesn't have the time to create the cookie in time, so all the updates goes through.

Any suggestions on how to solve this?

share|improve this question
1  
The only thing I can think of is throttling. You work out some way to only allow N number of votes per ip within the same few seconds. Like 1 vote every 5 seconds. You would have to record each vote separately if you are not already and store IP with that. – Jonathan Kuhn Oct 25 '12 at 22:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is where XSRF comes to play. In your site you should first create a random (properly salted and enoughly secure) string and store it in session. In all your pages you should be getting this session value and passing it with form submits. When examining user input you should be checking this value as part of the page request.

Now if in the poll page you are sending this, and in ajax.php you are examining this then you will find that value and know that this is a safe request. When someone tries something smart over firebug/jquery etc, they will not be able to access/send this value, and your pages can ignore such requests.

Of course, my explanation is an oversimplification for better/easier understanding. But do read more about it, that will help solve your scenario as well as make your code more robust.

Adding a simple pseudo code example:

Assume first your random XSRF string is already set in session.

jQuery.post('ajax.php', {
     <?php echo $_SESSION['token'];?>,
    //rest of the post parameters
});

Now when someone tries it with firebug:

for(var i=0;i<100;i++) {
    jQuery.post('ajax.php', {
        //post parameters
        //cannot access $_SESSION['token'] so cannot pass it..
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think I understand what you are suggesting, but I don't have form submitting, I use only ajax post with jquery. – Andrej Oct 25 '12 at 23:54
1  
@Andrej: I have added a simple pseudo code example which will help you better understand. – raidenace Oct 26 '12 at 0:07
    
Thank you, I will try to implement this! – Andrej Oct 26 '12 at 8:42

Try a redirect when you set the cookie, so that the Set-Cookie header is in the request

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