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I'm using an ARM microcontroller for a real-time systems course in my university. In the project I'm working on at the moment, I'm implementing the vector field histogram (VFH) algorithm.

The problem is: I need to communicate between threads; more specifically, I want to have a thread that gets sensor data from rangefinders, make the necessary transformations to it and deposit them in a queue. Them, another thread must get this data and process it, etc.

At the moment, I'm using a simpler version of it - one thread gets data from the ADCs (SensorAcquisitionHandler), another outputs the average of the first 5 items (at most) to a display (ControlSignalHandler).

/* Queue used to store data from the rangefinder sensors. */
static unsigned int Sensors[100];
static int SensorsHead = 0;
static int SensorsTail = 0;

void SensorAcquisitionHandler(void) {
    /* Clear the interrupt. */
    ADCIntClear(ADC0_BASE, 1);

    int i; /* Index for the measurements buffer. */

    /* There are only 3 rangefinders used. */
    if (ADCSequenceDataGet(ADC0_BASE, 1, rangeBuffer) == 3) {
        /* Put rangeBuffer's data into SensorDataQueue. */
        /* Also, when using SensorDataQueue, must put what's the direction of 
        the corresponding range measurement. */

        /* Critical section ahead!!! Turn off interrupts!!! */
        IntMasterDisable();

        /* Temporarily using the simple FIFO... */
        for (i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
            if (SensorsHead < 100) {
                Sensors[SensorsHead] = rangeBuffer[i];
                SensorsHead++;
            }
        }

        /* All is fine, turn on interrupts. */
        IntMasterEnable();
    }
}

void ControlSignalHandler(void) {
    /* Clear the timer interrupt. */
    TimerIntClear(TIMER0_BASE, TIMER_TIMA_TIMEOUT);

    unsigned char i; /* Index for the measurements buffer. */
    unsigned long average = 0;
    char buffer[20];

    /* Average first n (n <= 5) elements from Sensors queue. */
    for (i = 0; i < 5 && SensorsTail < SensorsHead; ++i) {
        average += Sensors[SensorsTail];
        SensorsTail++;
    }

    IntMasterDisable();
    average /= i;

    sprintf(buffer, "%d  ", average);

    average = 0;

    if (SensorsTail >= SensorsHead) {
        SensorsTail = 0;
        SensorsHead = 0;
    }

    Display96x16x1StringDraw(buffer, 0, 0);
    IntMasterEnable();
}

The result is relatively stable for some time but, at random intervals, gets extremely high (the result is ~330 almost all the time). Also, when I use a symbolic debugger during the "very high value" moments, the indexes SensorTail and SensorHead can get to 300+ (the queue is a 100-element array).

This sounds like some kind of overflow, but I can't visualize how it's happening. Can someone help me find it?

I know the answer to the problem is "use a thread-safe queue", but I want to understand how a race condition is happening here, how the indexes are getting messed up, etc. Thank you!

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2  
I'd start by replacing average += Sensors[SensorsTail]; SensorsTail++; by average += Sensors[SensorsTail++]; and declaring the head&tail pointers volatile. Maybe a sequence-point is a barrier (insert dmr rant here ;-) –  wildplasser Oct 25 '12 at 23:05
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

By clearing an interrupt, you are allowing it to happen again. Imagine what happens if (e.g.) the ControlSignalHandler gets re-entered in the middle of its first loop because the timer managed to outrun your code...

Wrap the entire function (both of them) in IntMasterDisable + IntMasterEnable, and clear the interrupt after the disable and before the enable. (I would do it immediately before the enable.)

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Highly likely it's ControlSignalHandler() that's overrunning seeing as it does a lot of very inappropriately heavy operations for an ISR. –  marko Oct 25 '12 at 23:45
    
Thanks Nemo, I'm starting to understand the problem with my routines. Now I can better visualize what's happening. :) –  agarie Oct 26 '12 at 0:25
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You can avoid the race conditions on the head and tail pointers by using a lock-less single-reader single writer FIFO - one in which the head pointer is only ever written in one thread (or in your case ISR) and the tail written in the other. This means you perform the test for buffer wrapping in each ISR.

If you did this and reset your interrupt source right at the end of the each ISR, you ought not to need any locking at all - globally disabling interrupts as you are doing is very bad manners. Currently you're holding the locks are long time.

Another reason why you need to rewrite your FIFO implementation is:

    for (i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
        if (SensorsHead < 100) {

Since you're adding 3 readings at a time, you'll eventually enter SensorAcquisitionHandler() with SensorsHead==99 - which guarantees you'll throw 2 readings away.

Similarly:

/* Average first n (n <= 5) elements from Sensors queue. */
for (i = 0; i < 5 && SensorsTail < SensorsHead; ++i) {
    average += Sensors[SensorsTail];
    SensorsTail++;
}

will in some circumstances perform the calculation on rather less than 5 values.

Depending on the ARM part you're using, there isn't hardware divide. Calculating your average over a power-of-two values is much cheaper as it's a single-cycle logical shift.

Finally, I imagine that Display96x16x1StringDraw(buffer, 0, 0); is a particularly expensive operation, and it may bot be thread-safe either. IO is always strictly verboten in ISRs. You probably want another queue between your timer thread and a non-interrupt context - which handles output.

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Marko, thank you for your answer. I didn't think about the space available for the FIFO and the 5 element average very much, as this was supposed to be a test (in which I learned much more than I thought I would). Similarly, that's why the display routine is in there. I'll use a better FIFO and use it to output it to the OLED. –  agarie Oct 26 '12 at 0:17
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What specific processor/microcontroller are you using? What RTOS (if any)?

The interrupt stack on an ARM microcontroller is often very, very small. A runtime routine like snprintf() can easily require hundreds of bytes, and could overrun a small stack. Even aside from stack space considerations, C runtime functions are often not safe to use in an interrupt context - you're often very constrained on what functions can be called from an interrupt. The specifics are dependent on the actual RTOS and compiler toolchain that you're using.

If you're violating these constraints it can easily cause corruption of data.

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I'm not using a RTOS - the project asked explicitly to not use one. And I know sprintf() stack requirements are ok in this case, as I've used it in other routines, but I'll reorganize the code so the output will be put in another FIFO and a slower routine will display it. –  agarie Oct 26 '12 at 0:22
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Look at the assembly dump. Non-volatile code can be re-ordered with respect to volatile code.

Imagine you have:

assignmentA_with_volatile_operands;
assignmentB_with_non_volatile_operands;
assignmentC_with_volatile_operands;

The compile is free to re-order this to:

assignmentA_with_volatile_operands;
assignmentC_with_volatile_operands;
assignmentB_with_non_volatile_operands;

For example your for loop in the first handler SensorAcquisitionHandler can be executed actually after IntMasterEnable as none of the objects appearing in the for loop is volatile qualified.

EDIT:

Some people think these kind of code reordering is not permitted. The fact is they are, and they are performed with real life compilers.

A volatile does not act as memory barrier in the program. You should not assume a volatile access acts a memory barrier with regard to non-volatile access.

The Standard defines in C11, 5.1.2.3 what are the The least requirements on a conforming implementation with regard to the observable behavior of the program.

gcc says for example: Accesses to non-volatile objects are not ordered with respect to volatile accesses. You cannot use a volatile object as a memory barrier to order a sequence of writes to non-volatile memory.

http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Volatiles.html

A lot of compilers are cautious not to perform these kind of code reorder optimizations in presence of volatile, but I've already seen compilers (gcc for example) performing them.

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Declaring the objects in the loop volatile will ensure that the compiler generates a load from memory on each use of SensorsHead, and an immediate save upon its modification SensorsHead++, and that all operation occur in strict order. The compiler absolutely cannot assume that the implementation IntMasterEnable() does not rely on preceding writes to SensorsHead or Sensors and will not re-order regardless of the presence or otherwise of volatile qualifiers. If IntMasterEnable() is in fact an intrinsic, a decent compiler will have an even stronger notion of the side-effects. –  marko Oct 26 '12 at 0:13
    
@Marko my comment didn't fit, so I added an edit to my answer to address your comment. –  ouah Oct 26 '12 at 10:08
    
Dowvoter, please explain why you downvoted this answer. –  ouah Oct 26 '12 at 10:09
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