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I have 3 PHP projects using the CodeIgniter framework which share some exact same files such as models libraries and controllers. What's the best way I could share these files across without having to keep in sync and update the same files across?

  • In linux I thought of using dynamic links and extract these files to a central place but that kind of breaks our version control and would create portability issues.
  • Another way perhaps to use unison on these files across projects

I'm assuming that's a common problem, what are common approaches?

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4 Answers 4

Separate them into a module, and use something like composer.

http://getcomposer.org/

Or just put them in a separate SCM.

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One thing you can do:

Put all the shared code in libraries, helpers and models and place this in a separate folder. Then use:

$this->load->add_package_path('shared location');

Also take a look here: http://codeigniter.com/user_guide/libraries/loader.html , under application packages.

This works for most of the stuff, except controllers.

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Use version control! In svn you can use externals, git has submodules or subtrees.

You don't want to use hardlinks, you'll run into weird issues like updating one project influences another project ("that I haven't touched in weeks").

The code can be in two physical places but shared under version control. There will always be only one authorative copy, namely the one in your version system. All physical copies are derivatives. It's important to see that you have control over when you update the code of a specific project, so a change at one point doesn't immediately break another project in case you made a mistake. If you do want to catch these kinds of errors, set up a proper regression testing environment.

Sharing a development environment with another developer is also a big no. You don't want to have to wait till your colleague fixes a parse error that breaks the entire program. Each developer should have their own copy (checkout!) of a project and similarly each project should have their own copy (externaled) of shared code.

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Seperate them into folders outside your project, then configure or include them in your projects.

Usually we will rewrite "autoloader" method for the project to find files in our new folders.

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I think this is the wrong approach. Sure you're saving harddisk space but you've now got some projects that are all dependent a shared codebase that is outside your project root. If you make a breaking change you must update all the projects. Better to use a versioning system that supports branches and tags so you can 'freeze' projects and avoid the immediate overhead of making a breaking change. –  Halcyon Oct 26 '12 at 0:41
    
This way is not to save hard disk, it keeps the shared library consistent in a small team. We don't want to repeat to modify or fix the same code scattered in multiple projects. What you said is correct, but not absolute. –  user1283182 Oct 26 '12 at 1:06
    
You misunderstand. The code is physically in two or more places but it's pulled from the same source in your versioning system. There is only one authorative copy, all physical copies are derivatives. If you fixed a bug in your shared code "update" all your other projects and the new code will be merged in. It's important to see that you have control over when you update the code of a specific project, so a change at one point doesn't immediately break another project incase you made a mistake. If you do want to catch these kinds of errors, set up a proper regression testing environment. –  Halcyon Oct 26 '12 at 13:22

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