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If everything I can do with an abstract class I can do with a regular super class, why would I ever use an abstract class when I could use a regular super class?

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Abstract forces implementation in a subclass and allows defined but unimplemented behavior. – Tim Medora Oct 26 '12 at 0:41

I think the comments and answers have already implied this, but I want to state it more bluntly: You can't do everything with a regular super class that you can do with a abstract class. An abstract class lets you define the signature of a method without including its implementation, and an abstract class won't allow you to instantiate it directly.

So if I have an class signature in mind with 3 methods and I don't want to share the implementations for any of them, I'll use an interface. If I want to share the implementation for one of those methods I'll use an abstract class, then make two of the methods in that class abstract. If I want to share all of the implementations for the methods I'll either use an abstract class, if it never makes sense to instantiate it directly, or I'll use a regular class if it does.

(This is based on my experience in C#. Details differ between languages.)

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Base classes provide their own implementation of methods. These implementations can sometimes be overridden (depending on the language).

Abstract classes provide no default implementation and every inheriting class needs to implement the methods on a case-by-case basis.

The above details can vary from language to language. Read the appropriate documentation.

Consider this example:
A Number abstract class has an add() method. A OddNumber and an EvenNumber subclass needs to implement virtually the same add() method so there's some code duplication there. Here, having a super class makes more sense (or, at least, having a RealNumber subclass of Number).

However, consider Complex as being a subclass of Number if number were not abstract, the add() method found in Number (assuming it's a real number addition algorithm) would make no sense for complex numbers. Here an abstract class makes more sense. Some languages let you override super-class methods, but that's kind of awkward in this scenario.

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Out of interest, when would you use an abstract add method, and when would you prefer an addable interface. I'm asking because my intuition tells me to prefer interfaces to inheritance. – jsj Oct 26 '12 at 12:36
    
An addable interface to me seems kind of clunky, even though it makes sense logically. To answer your question, it's simply a design decision. You can either use an interface, a superclass, or an abstract class. I like to use interfaces where many unrelated objects may need to provide a specific functionality (for example, logging). – David Titarenco Oct 27 '12 at 17:22

Abstract classes are very useful when you need to represent many similar things in a common way.

For example, say you wanted to represent a zoo in code and you needed to get the grocery list to make sure you had the right food. How do you represent the favorite food for all of your animals? And what noise each makes? How about how they move? You could try to use a superclass to hold big lists of foods, noises and movements, but it's easier to have a common definition for an Animal and then have each animal provide its own implementation details:

   public class Zoo {
      public Animals[] AnimalsInZoo { get; set;}

      public List<Food> GetGroceryList(){
         List<Food> groceries = new List<Food>();
         foreach(Animal a in Animals[]){
            groceries.Add(a.FavoriteFood);
         }
         return groceries;
      }

      public void  MakeAnimalsSing(){

         foreach(Animal a in Animals[]){
            a.MakeNoise();
         }

      }
   }

The abstract Animal class would look like:

   public abstract class Animal {
      public abstract void MakeNoise();
      public abstract Food FavoriteFood { get; }
      public abstract void Move();
   }

And say the zoo had two types of animals:

   public class Panda : Animal{
      public override void MakeNoise(){
         // grunt
      }

      public override void Move(){
         // walk
      }

      public override Food FavoriteFood { 
         get {
              return new Bamboo();
         }
      }
   }  

      public class Parrot: Animal{
      public override void MakeNoise(){
         // talk
      }

      public override void Move(){
         // fly
      }

      public override Food FavoriteFood { 
         get {
              return new Cracker();
         }
      }
   }  

By having a common abstract class I can easily work with any number of different animal types without having to know explicitly which one I'm working with, but each can behave in their own way.

A superclass just can't provide that flexibility or detail.

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You're describing polymorphism, but you don't generally need an abstract class to accomplish this in OO languages. In your code above you could do the same thing with an Animal super class with all virtual methods, or an Animal interface. – MichaC Oct 26 '12 at 1:07

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