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I'm trying to add methods to a class based on a list.

class _Roles(object):

""" 
set the roles for dev, stagging and production
"""                         
def __init__(self):         
    from types import MethodType                    
    steps = ['dev','stage','prod']                          
    for step in steps:
        def env_setter(self):                                   
            print step
        method = MethodType(env_setter,self,self.__class__)                                    
        setattr(self,step,method)

the problem is that when i call _Roles.dev(), _Roles.stage() or _Roles.prod() I always get printed the last step that is prod instead of getting dev for dev() and so on. what's the reason for this?

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I think it would be a better design if you just define different classes (perhaps using subclassing) for the different roles., then dynamically select the right class in a function or mapping. –  Keith Oct 26 '12 at 0:59
    
Another problem here is you are setting the method on the instance, and not the class. But.. this kind of monkey-patching is hard to debug and maintain. I would recommend avoiding it. –  Keith Oct 26 '12 at 1:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because you use the same scope for all function declarations. Define each function in a separate scope.

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hi thanks, in that case how can i set the 'step' parameter on the function before i bound the method? –  Oscar Yañez Oct 26 '12 at 0:59
    
Create another scope. Like within a function. That you pass step to. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 26 '12 at 1:02
    
but MethodType requires a callable function :/ –  Oscar Yañez Oct 26 '12 at 1:12
    
So return a callable function from that scope. What's the problem? There are many other alternatives, the best one involving rewriting your code so you don't need to do this in the first place, but @IgnacioVazquez-Abrams has the right answer if you really want to do things this way. –  abarnert Oct 26 '12 at 1:25
    
my bad, that did it, Thanks! –  Oscar Yañez Oct 26 '12 at 2:56

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