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scipy.spatial.distance.pdist returns a condensed distance matrix. From the documentation:

Returns a condensed distance matrix Y. For each and (where ), the metric dist(u=X[i], v=X[j]) is computed and stored in entry ij.

I thought ij meant i*j. But I think I might be wrong. Consider

X = array([[1,2], [1,2], [3,4]])
dist_matrix = pdist(X)

then the documentation says that dist(X[0], X[2]) should be dist_matrix[0*2]. However, dist_matrix[0*2] is 0 -- not 2.8 as it should be.

What's the formula I should use to access the similarity of a two vectors, given i and j?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can look at it this way: Suppose x is m by n. The possible pairs of m rows, chosen two at a time, is itertools.combinations(range(m), 2), e.g, for m=3:

>>> import itertools
>>> list(combinations(range(3),2))
[(0, 1), (0, 2), (1, 2)]

So if d = pdist(x), the kth tuple in combinations(range(m), 2)) gives the indices of the rows of x associated with d[k].

Example:

>>> x = array([[0,10],[10,10],[20,20]])
>>> pdist(x)
array([ 10.        ,  22.36067977,  14.14213562])

The first element is dist(x[0], x[1]), the second is dist(x[0], x[2]) and the third is dist(x[1], x[2]).

Or you can view it as the elements in the upper triangular part of the square distance matrix, strung together into a 1D array.

E.g.

>>> squareform(pdist(x)) 
array([[  0.   ,  10.   ,  22.361],
       [ 10.   ,   0.   ,  14.142],
       [ 22.361,  14.142,   0.   ]])

>>> y = array([[0,10],[10,10],[20,20],[10,0]])
>>> squareform(pdist(y)) 
array([[  0.   ,  10.   ,  22.361,  14.142],
       [ 10.   ,   0.   ,  14.142,  10.   ],
       [ 22.361,  14.142,   0.   ,  22.361],
       [ 14.142,  10.   ,  22.361,   0.   ]])
>>> pdist(y)
array([ 10.   ,  22.361,  14.142,  14.142,  10.   ,  22.361])
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I see, interesting. The squareform is easier to use, it seems. sq_form[i,j] will get me exactly the distance between y[i] and y[j]. However, I think the condensed form is better memory-wise. Perhaps I should read a little bit more on what squareform does. But there isn't a simple formula which converts i,j into a dist position, then? –  Rafael Almeida Oct 26 '12 at 2:43

If you want to access the element of pdist corresponding to the (i,j)th element of the square distance matrix, the math is as follows: Assume i < j (Otherwise flip indices) if i == j, the answer is 0.

X = random((N,m)) dist_matrix = pdist(X)

Then the (i,j)th element is dist_matrix[ind] where

ind = (N - array(range(1,i+1))).sum() + (j - 1 - i).

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The vector of the compressed matrix corresponds to the bottom triangular region of the square matrix. To convert for a point in that triangular region, you need to calculate the number of points to the left in the triangle, and the number above in the column.

You can use the following function to convert:

q = lambda i,j,n: n*j - j*(j+1)/2 + i - 1 - j

Check:

import numpy as np
from scipy.spatial.distance import pdist, squareform
x = np.random.uniform( size = 100 ).reshape( ( 50, 2 ) )
d = pdist( x )
ds = squareform( d )
for i in xrange( 1, 50 ):
    for j in xrange( i ):
        assert ds[ i, j ] == d[ q( i, j, 50 ) ]
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1  
Note that it really is the bottom triangular region, which might be strange to some. –  shaunc Apr 25 '14 at 16:22
1  
The bottom triangle is the transpose of the upper triangle because the distance matrix is symemtric, i.e. swapping j,i -> i,j gives identical results. Your solution uses the lower triangle interpretation, but there's nothing incorrect about the upper triangle version (which I think is the more common way people think about this) –  David Marx Oct 30 '14 at 22:10
    
I'm trying to move in the opposite direction: given an index into the condensed distance matrix (i.e. the flat vector), how can I get the matrix indexes (i,j) that correspond to that value without coercing it to the square form? –  David Marx Oct 30 '14 at 22:13
    
nevermind, found it! stackoverflow.com/a/14839010/819544 –  David Marx Oct 30 '14 at 22:30

This is the upper triangle version (i < j), which must be interesting to some:

condensed_idx = lambda i,j,n: i*n + j - i*(i+1)/2 - i - 1

This is very easy to understand:

  1. with i*n + j you go to the position in the square-formed matrix;
  2. with - i*(i+1)/2 you remove lower triangle (including diagonal) in all lines before i;
  3. with - i you remove positions in line i before the diagonal;
  4. with - 1 you remove positions in line i on the diagonal.

Check:

import scipy
from scipy.spatial.distance import pdist, squareform
condensed_idx = lambda i,j,n: i*n + j - i*(i+1)/2 - i - 1
n = 50
dim = 2
x = scipy.random.uniform(size = n*dim).reshape((n, dim))
d = pdist(x)
ds = squareform(d)
for i in xrange(1, n-1):
    for j in xrange(i+1, n):
        assert ds[i, j] == d[condensed_idx(i, j, n)]
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