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I have some NSData that I am passing in as bytes

const void *bytes = [responseData bytes];

Those bytes were originally UTF8 formatted, I am now trying to get them into a UTF8 NSString without messing with the encoding at all.

I have previously written this if that copies the bytes into a cstring which normally would be fine unless I have any non english characters in the bytes which take two byte instead of one. This means any international characters in my string get messed up when I copy them into a cstring.

Hence the reason for needing to copying the bytes directly into a UTF8 formatted object.. preferably a NSString.. if possible.

This is how I was handling the conversion which I later found out is wrong but will hopefully give you a good idea of what I am trying to achieve.

else if (typeWithLocalOrdering == METHOD_RESPONSE)
        {
            cstring = (char *) malloc(sizeWithLocalOrdering + 1);
            strncpy(cstring, bytes, sizeWithLocalOrdering);
            cstring[sizeWithLocalOrdering] = '\0';

            NSString *resultString = [NSString stringWithCString:cstring encoding:NSUTF16StringEncoding];
            methodResponseData =[resultString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF16StringEncoding]; // methodResponseData is used later on in my parsing method

            // Take care of the memory allocatoin, so that you can find the endoffile notification
            free(cstring);
            bytes += sizeWithLocalOrdering;
            length -= sizeWithLocalOrdering;

        }

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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2  
What's wrong with using [NSString stringWithUTF8String:cstring]? –  Hot Licks Oct 26 '12 at 1:56
    
I dont want it going into the cstring at all.. I would like to avoid cstring because its messing up my previous encoding which is UTF8 all english characters are 1 byte but if I have a international character which I do its 2 bytes... which is 2 characters of a cstring which messes things up.. so I have to avoid cstring. –  HurkNburkS Oct 26 '12 at 1:58
    
Of course, if your intent is to create the NSData object, why not just feed your cstring directly into an NSData creation? –  Hot Licks Oct 26 '12 at 1:58
    
You're not making sense. You start with "bytes". Why you copy that to "cstring", I don't know, but I was assuming you have your reasons. You could use "bytes" directly. –  Hot Licks Oct 26 '12 at 2:00
    
how would I feed my bytes into a NSData object and account for sizing etc.. because i only want a portion of the total number of bytes. –  HurkNburkS Oct 26 '12 at 2:01

2 Answers 2

I don't understand this: "This means any international characters in my string get messed up when I copy them into a cstring." If "sizeWithLocalOrdering" is correct for the actual length of the byte string, it seems like your original code should work (though I would have used memcpy rather than strncpy). If not, nothing's going to work.

Update: OK, I see it. Your original code was wrong here:

[NSString stringWithCString:cstring encoding:NSUTF16StringEncoding];

That should have been NSUTF8StringEncoding.

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So it turns out I had a few interesting things happening that I was not expecting..

This is the code I used to get around working with the cstring and just take the bytes straight to a NSString as its original encoding then

NSString *tempstring = [[NSString alloc] initWithBytes:bytes length:sizeWithLocalOrdering encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
            methodResponseData =[tempstring dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF16StringEncoding]; // methodResponseData is used later on in my parsing method
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