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I have two functionally identical header files, one of which produces errors for no discernible reason. I must have done something wrong in creating the new (broken) file, but I can't figure out what.

My IDE is Xcode. The project is compiled for Objective C++ using Apple LLVM Compiler 4.1, but the section of code in question is all pure C++, no Objective C.

Here's some code:

NamespaceA.Common.h

#include "../NamespaceB/Common.h"

#include "WorkingClass.h"
#include "BrokenClass.h"

...

../NamespaceB/Common.h

#ifndef NamespaceBCommon
#define NamespaceBCommon

namespace NamespaceB
{
    ...
}

...
#include "Superclass.h"
...

WorkingClass.h

#ifndef NamespaceA_WorkingClass
#define NamespaceA_WorkingClass

namespace NamespaceA
{
    class WorkingClass : public NamespaceB::Superclass
    {
    public:

        WorkingClass();
        ~WorkingClass();
    };
}

#endif

BrokenClass.h

#ifndef NamespaceA_BrokenClass
#define NamespaceA_BrokenClass

// If I don't have this line I get errors. Why??                   !!!!!
// This file is exactly identical to WorkingClass.h 
// as far as I can tell!
//#include NamespaceA.Common.h

namespace NamespaceA
{            
    // Parse Issue: Expected class name                            !!!!!
    // Semantic Issue: Use of undeclared identifier 'NamespaceB'
    class BrokenClass : public NamespaceB::Superclass
    {
    public:

        BrokenClass();
        ~BrokenClass();
    };
}

#endif

Thank you.

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1  
Where is NamespaceB being defined? Is the file that it is defined in being included by BrokenClass.h? –  Xymostech Oct 26 '12 at 2:16
1  
Why not post the other header files, just for completeness? As is we can't attempt to reproduce. –  Potatoswatter Oct 26 '12 at 2:18
    
The code here is simplified, but it conveys all the necessary information other than that NamespaceB is defined in ../NamespaceB/Common.h which you can see is included by NamespaceA.Common.h. –  Tim R. Oct 26 '12 at 2:20
    
I updated the question to add a bit of ../NamespaceB/Common.h but to me it seems evident that the problem is in the way BrokenClass was added to the project since the file is functionally identical to WorkingClass, in the same folder, both added to the same project, but only one emits errors. –  Tim R. Oct 26 '12 at 2:26
1  
Make a copy of the project, then start removing the things from places where you used "..." until either it works or you have a small complete example to ask about. –  aschepler Oct 26 '12 at 2:28
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found the problem. WorkingClass.cpp was including NamespaceA.Common.h and not including its own header file, rather than including the common file in the header and then including its own header file in the cpp.

I managed to miss the #include in WorkingClass.cpp because I just assumed it was only including WorkingClass.h and not NamespaceA.Common.h.

So in short:

WorkingClass.h

// Class goes here
// No includes

WorkingClass.cpp

// Notice it does not include WorkingClass.h for whatever reason
#include "NamespaceA.Common.h"

NamespaceA.Common.h

#include "../NamespaceB/Common.h"

#include "WorkingClass.h"
#include "BrokenClass.h"
#include "EveryOtherClass.h" ...

BrokenClass.h

// Class goes here
// No includes

BrokenClass.cpp

#include "BrokenClass.h"
// Oh no! Where's NamespaceA.Common.h?

I'm not a big fan of this include scheme, but I'll live with it since it's a large project that I don't want to make sweeping changes to.

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You need to include all of the files that include namespaces and classes that you reference in your code. So, because you reference NamespaceB::Superclass in your BrokenClass.h, you need to be sure to include the file that declares that. In this case, including NamespaceA.Common.h (hopefully) solves this problem, because it includes the file where NamespaceB is included.

As for why you don't have to include NamespaceA.Common.h in your WorkingClass.h, I suspect it's because you just happen to have ../NamespaceB/Common.h included somewhere else.

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Neither WorkingClass.h nor BrokenClass.h have any #includes at all. BrokenClass.h will compile just fine when I uncomment the #include, but what I want to know is why WorkingClass.h is able to compile without it. –  Tim R. Oct 26 '12 at 2:29
1  
@TimR. Is something else including NamespaceB/Common.h anywhere, outside of the code that you're showing us? I've made a working example at gist.github.com/3956598 and I get errors in both WorkingClass and BrokenClass. –  Xymostech Oct 26 '12 at 2:36
    
Thanks Xymostech, you're right. My answer to my question solves my problem, this project uses a really weird (to me at least) include scheme where every .cpp file includes the NamespaceA.Common.h file which includes every header in NamespaceA in addition to the NamespaceB/Common.h file. –  Tim R. Oct 26 '12 at 2:43
1  
@TimR. I'd guess recommend against that scheme... Although I'm not sure what the "best" way to include things is, I usually use a scheme where .cpp files only include their header files (and maybe some others to solve recursive inclusion), and in header files you include everything you have references to. That way, you don't end up with problems like these. :) –  Xymostech Oct 26 '12 at 2:46
    
Thanks, that's the scheme I'm familiar with, which is why I was thrown off by the common file being included in the cpp file rather than just including its own header file. Unfortunately this is a really huge project that I don't want to make huge structural changes to, so this way will have to stay. –  Tim R. Oct 26 '12 at 2:47
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