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This is an intricate but hopefully interesting question from someone who's done too much Haskell and C++ template meta-programming. Please bear with me

I am writing some generic Java code to check certain algebraic properties of functions, and I'm having some difficulty coming up with appropriate types for some of them.

As an example that works, here is a function to check that a function is commutative:

<E, R>
boolean checkCommutative( Binary<E,E,R> f
                        , Binary<R,R,Boolean> eq
                        , E a, E b)
{
    return eq.ap(f.ap(a,b), f.ap(b, a));
}

This function should read: "A binary function f that takes two E's and produces an R is commutative (with equality defined by the function eq that compares two R's), if for any a and b of type E, f applied to (a,b) is equal to f applied to (b,a)."

I can then test that a given function C.plus(Integer,Integer) is commutative by doing the following:

class Plus implements Binary<Integer, Integer, Integer> {
    Integer ap(Integer a, Integer b) { return C.plus(a,b); }
}

class Eq implements Binary<Integer, Integer, Boolean> {
    Boolean ap(Integer a, Integer b) { return a.equals(b); }
}

checkCommutative(new Plus(), new Eq(), rand(), rand());

and all is well and good.

Now I want to implement something more complex. Let's say I have a generic interface Group<E> with a plus method:

interface Group<E> {
    E plus(E,E);
}

let's say I have two implementations: TheIntegers and TheRationals:

class TheIntegers  implements Group<Integer> { ... }
class TheRationals implements Group<Fraction> { ... }

Now, I want to be able to capture the idea that a generic function F from the integers to the rationals commutes with a function g that is like Group.plus. As a first cut, I want to write something like this:

<E, R>
booleanCheckCommutesWith( Unary<E,R> f
                        , ?? g
                        , Binary<R,R,Boolean> eq
                        , E a, E b)
{
    return eq.ap(f.ap(g.ap(a,b)), g.ap(f.ap(a), f.ap(b));
}

class F implements Unary<TheIntegers, TheRationals> {
    Fraction ap (Integer x) { ... }
}

checkCommutesWith(new F(), new Plus(), new Eq(), rand(), rand());

The question here is what should the type for g be? The problem is that g is applied to two different types: E and R. In the concrete example, we want g to represent both Group<Integer>.plus(Integer,Integer) and Group<Fraction>.plus(Fraction,Fraction).

Now, the implementation of checkCommutesWith above can't possibly work, since the only distinction between the two calls to g.ap is the generic type, which is erased. So, I'll modify it a bit by adding the domain and range as objects:

boolean checkCommutesWith( Unary<DE,RE> f
                        , ?? g
                        , Binary<RE,RE,Boolean> eq
                        , S domain, S range
                        , E x, E y)
{
    return eq.ap( f.ap(g.ap(domain, x, y)),
                , g.ap(range, f.ap(x), f.ap(y))
                );
}

class Plus implements ??
{
    <E, G extends Group<E>>
    E ap (G gp, E x, E y) { return gp.plus(x,y); }
}

So what should the interface (??) look like? If this was C++ I would write the equivalent of

interface ?? <T> {
    <E, S extends T<E>>
    E ap(S, E, E);
}

but AFAICT Java does not have the equivalent of template-template parameters. That's where I'm stuck.

Note that I don't want to include Group as part of the signature of checkCommutesWith, since I want to be able to use this code with other structures as well. I think a generic definition should be possible (for some definition of "should" :)).

Update/Clarification The crux of the matter here is that the defining property of maps between sets is that they commute with eq(). The defining property of group homomorphisms is that they commute with plus(). The defining property of ring homomorphisms is that they commute with times(). I'm trying to define a generic commutesWith function that captures this idea, and I'm looking for the right abstraction to encapsulate eq, plus, and times (and other structures as well).

share|improve this question
    
strategy pattern –  rees Oct 26 '12 at 3:05
    
"The problem is that g is applied to two different types: E and R". If so, the problem is in your design, not java. Java is right when does not allow to do so. Can you please give more concrete example where such function g makes sense? –  Alexei Kaigorodov Oct 26 '12 at 6:14
    
@AlexeiKaigorodov: Consider the function plus(). If I give it a group, and two elements from that group, then it should give me an element of that group. I should be able to apply it to TheRationals to get a function from a pair of rationals to a rational, and to TheIntegers to get a function from integers to integers. Similarly, times(), when provided with a ring, and two elements of that ring, should provide me with an element of that ring. So the common structure that I'm trying to encapsulate is a function of the form <E, S extends T<E>> E ap (S, E, E), for an arbitrary T. –  mdgeorge Oct 26 '12 at 15:43
    
For more context, you can see my code for Group, Set and friends and Commutative and CommutesWith –  mdgeorge Oct 26 '12 at 17:40

3 Answers 3

I'm not certain it's sufficient for your purposes, but you might examine the type structure defined in the JScience library. In particular, the interfaces specified in org.jscience.mathematics.structure may represent a useful starting point.

share|improve this answer
1  
That is actually very similar to what I am trying to implement, but it does not provide the particular functionality I'm asking about here. In that package it is simply assumed that mathematical objects satisfy the properties they should, whereas I am trying to write a framework for unit testing them. –  mdgeorge Oct 26 '12 at 15:36

I fear that Java typing system is not strong enough to do this without unchecked casts. However, their impact can be minimized.

Consider defining this in Category-theoretical terms. This is general enough to express about everything, and the groups homomorphisms are a concrete case of morphisms between category objects.

Notes about the code below: 1. I curried your checkCommutesWith into a morphismTester relation. 2. eq is now a property of the CategoryObject and not just a parameter. 3. castToConcreteObject of Category is used to make that unchecked cast. In our example, this is safe if for GroupsCategory only GroupObject is used, and there are no different implementations of CategoryObject<GroupsCategory, E>.

public interface Category<C extends Category<C>>
{
    <E> CategoryObject<C, E>
    castToConcreteObject(CategoryObject<C, E> abstractObject);

    < DOM_E, COD_E
    , DOM_CO extends CategoryObject<C, DOM_E>
    , COD_CO extends CategoryObject<C, COD_E>
    >
    Binary<DOM_E, DOM_E, Boolean>
    morphismTester ( final Unary<DOM_E, COD_E> f
                   , DOM_CO domainObject
                   , COD_CO codomainObject
                   );
}


public interface CategoryObject<C extends Category<C>, E>
{
    Binary<E,E,Boolean> eq();
}


public interface GroupObject<E>
         extends CategoryObject<GroupsCategory, E>
{
    E plus(E a, E b);

    E invert(E a);

    @Override
    Binary<E,E,Boolean> eq();
}

public class GroupsCategory
  implements Category<GroupsCategory>
{
    @Override
    public <E>
    GroupObject<E>
    castToConcreteObject(CategoryObject<GroupsCategory, E> abstractObject)
    {
        return (GroupObject<E>) abstractObject;
    }

    @Override
    public < DOM_E, COD_E
           , DOM_CO extends CategoryObject<GroupsCategory, DOM_E>
           , COD_CO extends CategoryObject<GroupsCategory, COD_E>
           >
    Binary<DOM_E, DOM_E, Boolean>
    morphismTester ( final Unary<DOM_E, COD_E> f
                   , final DOM_CO abstractDomainObject
                   , final COD_CO abstractCodomainObject
                   )
    {
        final GroupObject<DOM_E> domainGroup
            = castToConcreteObject(abstractDomainObject);
        final GroupObject<COD_E> codomainGroup
            = castToConcreteObject(abstractCodomainObject);

        return new Binary<DOM_E, DOM_E, Boolean>()
        {
            @Override
            public Boolean ap(DOM_E a, DOM_E b)
            {
                return codomainGroup.eq().ap
                    (
                        codomainGroup.plus(f.ap(a), f.ap(b)),
                        f.ap(domainGroup.plus(a, b))
                    );
            }
        };
    }
}

Probably, to check more properties, you will need to define a category for each property. Then there may be categories which extend several others, and this will be exactly what describes the properties of their objects and morphisms between them.

share|improve this answer
    
This is less general than what I am trying to do, and it doesn't do the kind of abstraction I'm looking for. The key property of Set morphisms is that they commute with equals. Group morphisms are set morphisms that also commute with plus. Ring morphisms are group morphisms that also commute with times. I want to write the "CommutesWith" function that captures this common structure. With you approach, even with casting, I would have to write essentially the same function to check ring homs, group homs, and set homs. –  mdgeorge Oct 26 '12 at 16:04

As the first approximation, see code at

https://github.com/rfqu/CodeSamples/blob/master/src/so/SoFun.java

At least it compiles without warnings and errors :)

share|improve this answer
    
That's very close to what I had in mind (see also the code I posted). But applier is specialized to Groups: I can't implement EqApplier (for sets) and TimesApplier (for rings). –  mdgeorge Oct 26 '12 at 18:38
    
@mdgeorge look at another variant: github.com/rfqu/CodeSamples/blob/master/src/so/SoFun2.java –  Alexei Kaigorodov Oct 27 '12 at 12:28
    
The problem with using the visitor pattern here is that it restricts the applier to integers and rationals. In reality there are a whole class of types to which plus applies. –  mdgeorge Oct 27 '12 at 21:11

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