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I have a class called user which has a lname field. Is this the right way to overload the "<" operator?

bool User::operator<(const User& other)
{
    std::cout << "< operator was called" << std::endl;
    if (this != &other)
    {
        if (lname.compare(other.lname) == 0)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

I am trying to use this in a more complicated set of things and it is failing - just want to make sure this much is right.

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7  
The first return false; is kind of messing it up. It could also do with being const. –  chris Oct 26 '12 at 2:53
    
What type is lname? Could you not just return lname.compare(other.lname) < 0 or something like that? –  Xymostech Oct 26 '12 at 2:54
1  
Since you don't specify what compare does it's hard to tell if you're doing it correctly. –  Mark Ransom Oct 26 '12 at 2:56
    
Bagh, sorry, that return false wasnt meant to be there. –  PinkElephantsOnParade Oct 26 '12 at 2:56
2  
why use == 0 for an operator<? why the self-identity checks? why the if statement instead of just returning the result of comparison? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 26 '12 at 2:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As others have pointed out, your operator< doesn't allow the left side to be const. Changing the function signature to

bool User::operator<(const User& other) const

is an improvement. But I would actually recommend making it a non-member function instead:

class User {
public:
    friend bool operator<(const User& u1, const User& u2);
    // ...
};

bool operator<(const User& u1, const User& u2)
{
    // ...
}

For one thing, it's a little more legible in my opinion.

But also, it sometimes makes a technical difference. With a non-member function, the expression a < b attempts implicit conversions on both a and b to see if your operator< is a viable overload. But with a member function, implicit conversions can apply to b, but not to a: a must be of type User or a derived type. This can lead to surprising situations where a < b compiles but b < a doesn't.

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It seems better to me to hide the 'lname' field as private.

return lname.compare(other.getName()) < 0;
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1  
Why do you think his lname is not private? –  user93353 Oct 26 '12 at 3:37
    
This answer makes no sense, User::operator< is a member function of User, and so is always able to members of Users regardless of whether they are private or not. –  Mankarse Oct 26 '12 at 6:28

Try:

bool User::operator<(const User& other) const
{
    return lname.compare(other.lname) < 0;
}
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The correct way to implement operator< is as a const-function:

bool User::operator<( const User& other ) const

This means that the function does not modify its members and thus can be called on const instances of your class.

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