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In my app, I want to programmatically bring the most recently used third party Activity to the front. After looking at other answers here, I've tried relaunching the activity using the baseIntent returned from a list of recent tasks, but that does not seem to bring the activity to the front over whatever else is going on.

My end goal is to create an app that replaces the incoming call screen with a small overlay so the user is not pulled completely out of whatever app they are using when they get a call. I've found you can't replace the default incoming call screen (if this is not true, please let me know as I'd rather do that instead) so as a workaround, I am trying to call the most recently used app to the front of the screen (to overlay the incoming call screen) and then display my overlay on top of that.

Here's the code I am using (The activity is launched from a broadcast receiver)

public class BringMRUAppToFront extends Activity
{
    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        ActivityManager activityManager = (ActivityManager) getSystemService("activity");
        List<RecentTaskInfo> recentTasks = activityManager.getRecentTasks(1, ActivityManager.RECENT_WITH_EXCLUDED);
        if(recentTasks.size() > 2) {
            RecentTaskInfo recentTask = recentTasks.get(2);
            Intent testIntent = recentTask.baseIntent;
            Log.i("MyApp", "Recent task - " + recentTask.baseIntent.getComponent().getPackageName());

            testIntent.setFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_REORDER_TO_FRONT); 
            startActivity(testIntent);
        }
        finish();
    }
}

Is there a reliable way to bring any third party activity to the front? The activity is guaranteed to be in memory (if one is not in memory, then I would just display the home screen), so there shouldn't be an issue there. I also don't believe it would be a security issue in this case as it would just be displaying an app that was visible right before the phone rang - though I do understand that opening this up in general in the SDK could pose a risk...still hoping it is possible.

EDIT: Modified the code slightly to reflect what I'm doing. The desired task will almost always be the 3rd task in the list - first is the current task and second is the task of the ringing phone. I am able to call the task to the front, but it is not always in the same state (going to the browser's page instead of the settings screen in the browser, for example). How does the recent tasks list do this?

share|improve this question
    
can you post your complete source code.. – kamal_tech_view Sep 13 '13 at 12:47
    
What else do you want to see? This activity is launched from a broadcast receiver that gets called when the phone rings, aside from that, none of the other code is relevant to the issue. – Eric Brynsvold Sep 13 '13 at 15:55
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Figured it out by looking at the Android source code - this is exactly what the Recent Tasks screen does, both pre- and post-Honeycomb:

RecentTaskInfo recentTask = recentTasks.get(1); // task 0 is current task
// maintains state more accurately - only available in API 11+ (3.0/Honeycomb+)
if(android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= android.os.Build.VERSION_CODES.HONEYCOMB) {
    final ActivityManager am = (ActivityManager) getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
    am.moveTaskToFront(recentTask.id, ActivityManager.MOVE_TASK_WITH_HOME);
} else { // API 10 and below (Gingerbread on down)
    Intent restartTaskIntent = new Intent(recentTask.baseIntent);
    if (restartTaskIntent != null) {
        restartTaskIntent.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_LAUNCHED_FROM_HISTORY);
        try {
            startActivity(restartTaskIntent);
        } catch (ActivityNotFoundException e) {
            Log.w("MyApp", "Unable to launch recent task", e);
        }
    }
}

Permission android.permission.REORDER_TASKS is necessary for this to work correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
does not work for me – Longerian Aug 22 '13 at 3:48
    
I didn't find this to be 100% reliable, though it worked in most cases - what version of Android are you running and what app are you trying to bring to the foreground? – Eric Brynsvold Aug 22 '13 at 14:56
    
do you get any better approach.. – kamal_tech_view Sep 13 '13 at 12:47
    
Unfortunately no, this is what the app shipped with and I haven't revisited it. – Eric Brynsvold Sep 13 '13 at 15:55
    
From API Level 21 (Android 5.0) getRecentTasks() doesn't work any more (method deprecated and logic modified) and there is no way to get the tasks id for moveTaskToFront(). – AxeEffect Feb 2 '15 at 14:15

Start from Android L, getRecentTasks() returns application’s own tasks and possibly some other non-sensitive tasks (such as Home), so you can not do such job.

References: https://developer.android.com/preview/api-overview.html#Behaviors

share|improve this answer

Why dont you use a global static variable that is accessed by all activities and on its onPause just set that variable to that activity value Eg I am placing a static variable called ActivityName

public static String ActivityName = "";

and in the onPause of every activity just assign it the activities pacakage name

@Override
public void onPause() {
    super.onPause();
    // The static global variable 
    com.pacakagename.Utls.ActivityName = "com.pacakagename.Act1";
}

So when any of the activity pauses the value is assinged and you will come to know of the most recent paused activity and you can restart it using Class.forName(ActivityName)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion - this would work if I were trying to bring my own activities to front, but I want to bring the most recently used activity - even if it is Gmail, Chrome, Angry Birds, whatever - back to the front. I edited the title/post to make this more clear. – Eric Brynsvold Oct 26 '12 at 13:06

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