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Possible Duplicate:
how to repeat along two axis

Let's suppose we have the following matrix/image:

x = array([[1, 0, 1],
           [0, 1, 0],
           [1, 0, 1]])

What I'd like to get is a 9x9 matrix that is a 3x magnified version of the above, having 3x3 ones in the top left corner, 3x3 0s in the middle top, etc.

The things I've already tried are:

scipy.ndimage.interpolation.zoom(x, 3, order=(anything)), for example order=0 returns this:

array([[1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1],
       [0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1]])

scipy.misc.imresize(x, (9,9), interp="nearest") (effectively from PIL), that comes up with a different creative (but wrong) solution.

Meanwhile, the MATLAB imresize solves the problem perfectly...

Any ideas? (note: all of these solutions should work, so before submitting, try it out :))

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marked as duplicate by wim, Lev Levitsky, Martijn Pieters, Junuxx, Graviton Nov 9 '12 at 2:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Kronecker product:

numpy.kron(x,numpy.ones((3,3)))

the result:

array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.]])
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1  
Clever and beautiful! –  Robert Smith Oct 26 '12 at 3:35
    
awesome, thanks! –  Latanius Oct 26 '12 at 3:46
    
@RobertSmith thanks, personally I find it more fun to use these mathematical tricks even if there are specially-tailored functions that can do the same. The code may be less comprehensible, though... –  Bitwise Oct 26 '12 at 3:49
    
It could be less comprehensible but this is a good reason to remember the good old Kronecker product. –  Robert Smith Oct 26 '12 at 4:04

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