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I have a vector<MyType*>* and I'm not entirely sure how it is being accessed. I am declaring MyType* var = new MyType(params) and it is accessed fine in the class it was created in. The numbers spit out just fine. When I return a vector of those and attempt to access it from another class (int main() method), I am getting completely different numbers.

The way I am accessing it in int main() is

MyType* Temp = reinterpret_cast<MyType*>(&ReturnedVector[i]);

Is something miss pointed here? I'm new to C++.

EDIT: Adding code for clarification. Here is my main method:

int main(array<System::String ^> ^args)
{
    MyAPI API;
    std::vector<MyClass*>* RetVector = API.GetVector();

    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < RetVector->size(); i++)
    {
        MyClass* Temp = reinterpret_cast< MyClass* >(&RetVector[i]);
        cout << Temp->value << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

Here is the vector returning method in a different class:

vector<MyClass*>* MyAPI::GetVector()
{
vector<MyClass*>* Ret = new vector<MyClass*>();
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
MyClass* Tmp = new MyClass(params);
Ret->push_back(Tmp);
}
return Ret;
}
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closed as too localized by jogojapan, Adriano Repetti, owlstead, RichardTheKiwi, j0k Oct 26 '12 at 11:43

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Please put some code so as to understand, what exactly you are doing... –  Recker Oct 26 '12 at 3:39
    
If that doesn't work without the cast than it's also wrong with a cast. –  sth Oct 26 '12 at 3:45
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2 Answers

You should not need the reinterpret_cast. Any time you are doing that, think carefully about why you are doing it. If it's to overcome a type warning the compiler is giving you, that warning may be entirely valid.

vector<MyType*> *ReturnedVector = some_function_that_returns_a_vector_pointer();

// NAUGHTY!
MyType* Temp = reinterpret_cast<MyType*>(&ReturnedVector[i]);

This is bad. You assume that ReturnedVector is a pointer to an array of vector<MyType*>, and ask for the ith element of that array. You then take the address of that element (MyType**) and cast it to MyType*. It's no wonder your numbers are different. You are lucky your program does not spit the proverbial dummy.

Note that &ReturnedVector[i] is the same as ReturnedVector + i.

Here's the correct method. You dereference the pointer to get a vector<MyType*> and then call its array index operator to retrieve the ith element. That element is a MyType* of course, and there's no need to cast.

// NICE!
MyType* Temp = (*ReturnedVector)[i];

Edit, since you have now posted some code... A more common way to get a vector populated and returned from a function is to pass it by reference. That way you don't deal with pointers to vectors and ugly dereferencing, and you don't need to delete the vector afterwards. Try this:

void MyAPI::GetVector( vector<MyClass*> & vec )
{
    vec.clear();
    vec.reserve(100);

    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        vec.push_back( new MyClass(params) );
    }
}

Update. When I wrote this answer, I wasn't very familiar with Return-Value Optimization, and as such I was paranoid about the potential copying that would take place when you return a vector. This is actually not an issue. The modern approach is to simply return the vector:

vector<MyClass*> MyAPI::GetVector()
{
    vector<MyClass*> vec;
    vec.reserve(100);
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        vec.push_back( new MyClass(params) );
    }
    return vec;
}

And, as C++11 becomes more normal, we are beginning to abandon raw pointers in favour of std::shared_ptr and std::unique_ptr plus move-semantics:

vector<unique_ptr<MyClass> > MyAPI::GetVector()
{
    vector<unique_ptr<MyClass> > vec;
    vec.reserve(100);
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        vec.push_back( std::move( unique_ptr<MyClass>(new MyClass(params)) ) );
    }
    return vec;
}
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1  
If pointers are really needed they should probably be wrapped in an appropriate smart pointer or else one needs to manually delete them. Also in c++11, one should not really worry about returning the vector directly, as it will be moved and not copied. So the function signature should probably be std::vector<std::unique_ptr<MyClass>> MyApi::GetVector(); or even std::vector<MyClass> MyApi::GetVector();. –  villintehaspam Oct 26 '12 at 6:13
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just replace this

for (unsigned int i = 0; i < RetVector->size(); i++)
{
    MyClass* Temp = reinterpret_cast< MyClass* >(&RetVector[i]);
    std::cout << Temp->value << std::endl;
}

with

while(!RetVector->empty())
{
    MyClass* Temp = RetVector->pop_back();
    std::cout << Temp->value << std::endl;
}
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