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I have the following scenario:

x = 0b0111

I would like to convert this value to:

y = [0, 1, 1, 1]

When I convert x = 0b1001, I can get y = [1, 0, 0, 1], but when I try to do the same for x = 0b0111, and then convert back with str(bin(y)) - I seem to lose the leading 0, and get 0b111.

Any suggestions?

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1  
0b0111 == 0b111 so what's the problem? If you need the lists to be fixed length, then just tack on the appropriate amount of 0's to the beginning. –  Joel Cornett Oct 26 '12 at 5:15

6 Answers 6

Once you get that string 0b111, it's straightforward to split out the digits that you're interested in. For each character of everything after the 0b in the string, convert it to an integer.

[int(d) for d in str(bin(x))[2:]]
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First convert the number to binary and then to string:

str(bin(7))
'0b111' #note the 0b in front of the binary number

Next, remove the 0b from the string

str(bin(7))[2:]
'111'

Finally we use list comprehension to create a list of ints from the string, which has roughly the following form:

[expr for i in iterable]
[int(i) for i in str(bin(x))[2:]]
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Please explain the answer to OP as well with the code. –  Coding Mash Oct 26 '12 at 5:36

check this simple way to do it... for this particular scenario

In [41]: x=0b0111

In [42]: l = [0,0,0,0]

In [43]: counter = -1

In [44]: for i in str(bin(x))[2:]:
   ....:     l[counter] = i
   ....:     counter = counter -1
   ....:

In [45]: l
Out[45]: [0, '1', '1', '1']
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An expression like map(int, list(bin((1<<8)+x))[-4:]) will give you the low 4 bits of a number, as a list. (Edit: A cleaner form is map(int,bin(x)[2:].zfill(4)) ; see below.) If you know how many bits you wish to show, replace the 4 (in [-4:]) with that number; and make the 8 (in (1<<8)) a larger number if necessary. For example:

>>> x=0b0111
>>> map(int,list(bin((1<<8)+x))[-4:])
[0, 1, 1, 1]
>>> x=37; map(int,list(bin((1<<8)+x))[-7:])
[0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1]
>>> [int(d) for d in bin((1<<8)+x)[-7:]]
[0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1]

The last example above shows an alternative to using map and list. The following examples show a slightly cleaner form for obtaining leading zeroes. In these forms, substitute the desired minimum number of bits in place of 8.

>>> x=37; [int(d) for d in bin(x)[2:].zfill(8)]
[0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1]
>>> x=37; map(int,bin(x)[2:].zfill(8))
[0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1]
>>> x=37; map(int,bin(x)[2:].zfill(5))
[1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1]
>>> x=37; map(lambda k:(x>>-k)&1, range(-7,1))
[0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1]
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For what it's worth, a pure arithmetic solution appears to be marginally faster:

>>> import timeit
>>> 
>>> def bits1(n):
...     b = []
...     while n:
...         b = [n & 1] + b
...         n >>= 1
...     return b or [0]
... 
>>> timeit.timeit(lambda: bits1(12345678))
7.717339038848877
>>> 
>>> def bits2(n):
...     return map(int, list(bin(n)[2:]))
... 
>>> timeit.timeit(lambda: bits2(12345678))
10.297518014907837
>>> 
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c=[]
for i in bin(7)[2:]: 
        c.append(int(i)) #turning string "111", to 111
if len(c)==3:
    c.insert(0,0)
print(c)

# binary digit 7 produces '0b111' by this slicing[2:], result get '111'

so if element in list c is 3, 0 is inserted first.

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1  
Kindly Post some explanation of the answer as well. –  Coding Mash Oct 26 '12 at 6:21

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