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In one of the examples in my book it creates two methods. One called combinations and one called factorial. The body on the combinations method contains the following code

private int combinations(int n, int k){
  return factorial(n) / (factorial (k) * factorial (n-k));
    }

In an example of actually seeing how the math works out for this formula the textbook gives the following example. With n = 5 and k = 2. It gives the following steps and says you should get 10. I'm having difficulty understating the logic.

Does ! have a special meaning in this case? How does 5! = 120 and how does !2 x !3 = 2 x 6?

C (n,k)  =     n! 
           _________
           k! x (n - k)! 



C (5,2)  =     5! 
           ___________
             2! x !3 


         =   120 
           _________
             2 x 6 

         =  10
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Wow. I feel stupid. I just read a section about using factorials. I just didn't connect the dots. –  Jessica M. Oct 26 '12 at 5:33
    
@YegorChumakov. And may be you shouldn't be talking so rude. You can even tell the same thing in a polite way. –  Rohit Jain Oct 26 '12 at 5:41
    
@RohitJain maybe i've been too offensive, but i definitely advise Jessika to study some math, because it will be hard to she to go further in cs without it. –  Yegor Chumakov Oct 26 '12 at 5:47
    
@YegorChumakov. Yeah that is true. And it is good to suggest what is correct. But just be polite, that's what I wanted to say. Anyways, it happens. Cheers :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 26 '12 at 5:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

n! means factorial(n). It is equal to: -

n! = n * (n - 1) * (n - 2) * .... * 1

So,

5! = 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 = 120

And !3 is rather a typo in your book. It doesn't represent a factorial

share|improve this answer
    
I knew what it meant but for some reason it slipped my mind when I saw it in a formula. –  Jessica M. Oct 26 '12 at 5:59
    
@JessicaM.. Its ok. It happens. Many times the very obvious concept slips from your mind. :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 26 '12 at 6:01

! denotes a factorial.

5! = 120 

because

5! = 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1

and

2! x 3! = 2 * 6 

because

2! x 3! = (2 * 1) * (3 * 2 * 1)

Factorial

share|improve this answer
    
I just read a section on factorials but it just slipped my mind that ! meant factorials. –  Jessica M. Oct 26 '12 at 6:02

The ! (factorial) symbol means the product of all integers up to and including the number. So, for example:

5! = 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 = 120

This should help clarify what the factorial(int) method is doing.

By the way, if your book actually printed "!3" instead of "3!", it's a typo.

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Thanks for the answer. –  Jessica M. Oct 26 '12 at 5:58

the factorial of a non-negative integer n, denoted by n! . and

n! = n * (n - 1) * (n - 2).... * 1

So

5! = 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 == 120
3! = 3 * 2 * 1         == 6
2! = 2 * 1             == 2

C (5,2)  =     5!   
            __________
              2! x 3! 

equals

    =   120 
       _________
         2 x 6 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the breakdown. –  Jessica M. Oct 26 '12 at 5:59
    
@JessicaM. i think 3! was mistakenly written !3 in your textbook. –  Sumit Singh Oct 26 '12 at 6:10
    
I mistakenly put !3 and not 3! when I was typing the question. –  Jessica M. Oct 26 '12 at 6:14
    
Its Ok, no problem.:) –  Sumit Singh Oct 26 '12 at 6:22

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