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This is the first time I've encountered something like below.

  • Multiple Threads (Inner classes implementing Runnable) sharing a Data Structure (instance variable of the upper class).

  • Working: took classes from Eclipse project's bin folder, ran on a Unix machine.

  • NOT WORKING: directly compiled the src on Unix machine and used those class files. Code compiles and then runs with no errors/warnings, but one thread is not able to access shared resource properly.

  • PROBLEM: One thread adds elements to the above common DS. Second thread does the following...

    while(true){
     if(myArrayList.size() > 0){
     //do stuff
     }
    

    }

  • The Log shows that the size is updated in Thread 1.

  • For some mystic reason, the workflow is not enetering if() ...

Same exact code runs perfectly if I directly paste the class files from Eclipse's bin folder.

I apologize if I missed anything obvious.

Code:

ArrayList<CSRequest> newCSRequests = new ArrayList<CSRequest>();

//Thread 1

private class ListeningSocketThread implements Runnable {
    ServerSocket listeningSocket;

    public void run() {
        try {
            LogUtil.log("Initiating...");
            init(); // creates socket
            processIncomongMessages();
            listeningSocket.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    private void processIncomongMessages() throws IOException {     
        while (true) {
            try {
                processMessage(listeningSocket.accept());
            } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {                    
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    private void processMessage(Socket s) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException {
        // read message
        ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(s.getInputStream());
        Object message = ois.readObject();
        LogUtil.log("adding...: before size: " + newCSRequests.size());
        synchronized (newCSRequests) {
                newCSRequests.add((CSRequest) message);
        }
        LogUtil.log("adding...: after size: " + newCSRequests.size()); // YES, THE SIZE IS UPDATED TO > 0
        //closing....

    }

........

}

//Thread 2
private class CSRequestResponder implements Runnable {

        public void run() {
            LogUtil.log("Initiating..."); // REACHES..
            while (true) {
//              LogUtil.log("inside while..."); // IF NOT COMMENTED, FLOODS THE CONSOLE WITH THIS MSG...
                if (newCSRequests.size() > 0) { // DOES NOT PASS
                    LogUtil.log("inside if size > 0..."); // NEVER REACHES....
                    try {
                        handleNewCSRequests();
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }
            }
        }
....
}

UPDATE Thanks a lot @maasg ...

Solution was to add synchronized(myArrayList) before I check the size in the Thread 2.

share|improve this question
2  
could you post the code where the shared structure is being accessed? the snippet above shows no use of proper locking. –  maasg Oct 26 '12 at 6:45
    
You missed the most obvious part: posting the code... Apart from that, I highly recommend reading the Java Concurrency In Practice book, it is a life saver in such situations. –  ppeterka Oct 26 '12 at 6:55
    
@maasg thanks for the reply, updated the code.. –  phani Oct 26 '12 at 6:58
    
@ppeterka thanks for the reply, posted the code.. –  phani Oct 26 '12 at 6:58
    
This is indeed a case of incorrect synchronization. Please update the title of the question to better reflect the issue at hand. There's no bug to speak of. –  maasg Oct 26 '12 at 7:05
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To access a shared structure in a multi-threaded environment, you should use implicit or explicit locking to ensure safe publication and access among threads. Using the code above, it should look like this:

while(true){
    synchronized (myArrayList) {
        if(myArrayList.size() > 0){
            //do stuff
        }
    }
    //sleep(...) // outside the lock!
}

Note: This pattern looks much like a producer-consumer and is better implemented using a queue. LinkedBlockingQueue is a good option for that and provides built-in concurrency control capabilities. It's a good structure for safe publishing of data among threads. Using a concurrent data structure lets you get rid of the synchronized block:

Queue queue = new LinkedBlockingQueue(...)
...
while(true){
        Data data = queue.take(); // this will wait until there's data in the queue
        doStuff(data);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot, I will try to implement the above, btw, any ideas on why it worked if copied the classes directly from eclipse's bin folder? –  phani Oct 26 '12 at 7:02
    
i cannot believe there's a need to add synchronized() before I check for the size. In addition, am not sure why it worked consistently on some machine while failed consistently on another machine.. I ran at least 10-20 times... same result.. –  phani Oct 26 '12 at 7:34
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Everytime you are modifying a given shared variable inside a parallel region (region with multiple threads running in parallel) you must ensure mutual exclusion. You can garanty mutual exclusion in Java by using synchronized or locks, normally you use locks when you want a finer grain synchronization.

If the program only performance reads on a given shared variable there is no need for synchronized the access to this variable.

Since your are new in this subject I recomend you this tutorial

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply.. –  phani Oct 26 '12 at 21:25
add comment

If I got this right.. There are at least 2 threads that work with the same, shared, datastructure. The array you mentioned.. One thread adds values to the array and the second thread "does stuff" if the size of the array > 0. There is a chance that the thread scheduler ran the second thread (that checks if the collection is > 0), before the first thread got a chance to run and add a value. Running the classes from bin or recompiling them has nothing to do. If you were to run the application over again from the bin directory, you might seen the issue again. How many times did you ran the app? It might not reproduce consistently but at one point you might see the issue again.

You could access the datastruce in a serial fashion, allowing only one thread at a time to access the array. Still that does not guarantee that the first thread will run and only then the second one will check if the size > 0.

Depending on what you need to accomplish, there might be better / other ways to achieve that. Not necessarily using a array to coordinate the threads..

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Check the return of

newCSRequests.add((CSRequest) message);

I am guessing its possible that it didn't get added for some reason. If it was a HashSet or similar, it could have been because the hashcode for multiple objects return the same value. What is the equals implementation of the message object?

You could also use

List list = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList(...));

to ensure the arraylist is always synchronised correctly.

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply, yeah the element is getting added, I could see the new size in the log, you may check the posted code for the Log-related code.. –  phani Oct 26 '12 at 7:12
    
@phani so it does. my bad. Check the java version / type on the unix box to see if is different from what Eclipse is using. Could explain why it works in Eclipse but not from manual compile. –  drone.ah Oct 26 '12 at 7:32
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