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I have referenced one DLL (I have source code of this) say Dll_A in which there is a function

private void uploadPic(int a)

In my main project, I have a function say

private void passMe(int b)
{
}

I need to pass the above function (passMe) to uploadPic function in Dll_A, how can I do that? Is it possible? I am able to use functions of the Dll_A from my main project, so instantiating isn't a problem, I just need a way to pass function.

=== Thanks, giving it a try. If some can edit code below

//code in main project  picbackman.cs
public delegate void delObj(int v);
private void uploadSome(string path, string fName, string str)
{
delObj del1 = new delObj(updatePValue);
UploadFileResponse response =  boxProvider1.UploadFiles(args1, folderString, ((Picbackman.BoxProvider.delObj)( del1)));
}
//code in different dll which is referenced in main project //Dll_A                     

public delegate void delObj(int v);
public UploadFileResponse UploadFiles(string[] filePathes,string folderId, delObj d)
{}
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1  
how can you pass a function when the uploadPic takes int? –  nawfal Oct 26 '12 at 6:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all your method will need to accept a delegate as one of it's parameters. That would be something like

private void uploadPic(Action<int> func,int a){
   //at some point do func(someInt);
}

at another point declare anothe method or function

public class someClasse {
   public vois passMe(int b){
  ...
  }
}

First of all notice that the access modifier has changed. if they are not in the same class you will need to be able to access one from the other so they can't both be private and since they are in different assemblies internal won't work either.

when you need the delegate do like this

var obj = new someClass();
var myInt = 5; //or whatever the value is
uploadPic(obj.passMe,myInt);

notice that the method is used with out arguments. When using a method without arguments the compiler will try and convert it to a suitable delegate.

I'd recommend you not to use delegate but stick with Func/Action they are delegates but more generic

public delegate void DelObj1();
public delegate void DelObj2()

public void F(){};

var del1 = new DelObj1(F);
var del2 = new DelObj2(F);

you can't pass a del1 where a DelObj2 is needed even though you use the same method for each. You will not have that issue if you use Action/Function

Action del1 = F;
Action del2 = F;

The reason is that DelObj1 and DelObj2 are two distinct classes with the same base class Ie they are siblings in the type tree. Using Action the type is the same for both del1 and del2

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Thanks, giving it a try. If some can edit code below //code in main project picbackman.cs public delegate void delObj(int v); private void uploadSome(string path, string fName, string str) { delObj del1 = new delObj(updatePValue); UploadFileResponse response = boxProvider1.UploadFiles(args1, folderString, ((Picbackman.BoxProvider.delObj)( del1))); } //code in different dll which is referenced in main project //Dll_A public delegate void delObj(int v); public UploadFileResponse UploadFiles(string[] filePathes,string folderId, delObj d) {} –  sujit Oct 26 '12 at 7:48
    
The code is rather unreadable as a comment. Post it as part of the question instead –  Rune FS Oct 26 '12 at 7:50
1  
I have edited my original question for explanation, I dont know how to post as part of the question. –  sujit Oct 26 '12 at 7:55
    
Thanks it works now :-) –  sujit Oct 26 '12 at 10:14

You should have a look at Delegates.

From the documentation:

A delegate is a type that references a method. Once a delegate is assigned a method, it behaves exactly like that method. The delegate method can be used like any other method, with parameters and a return value

and

Delegates allow methods to be passed as parameters

So in your case you should be able to do something like this:

// define the delegate
public delegate int PictureDelegate(int value)

// define your passMe function (in the class MyClass for example)
public int passMe(int value)
{
    return value + 1;
}

// when you want to use it
MyClass myInstance = new MyClass();
PictureDelegate passFunc = new PictureDelegate(myInstance.passMe);
myDll.uploadPic(passFunc, 12);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the response. But when I try to pass delegate it says cannot convert THIS TYPE to THAT TYPE .. Nawfail : I can edit that function to accept function in addition to int which it is accepting. I just don't know how to do that –  sujit Oct 26 '12 at 7:11
    
I've edited my answer to add a code sample that seems to correspond to your case. HTH –  Yannick Blondeau Oct 26 '12 at 7:20
    
@sujit if you had the luxury to modify the dll function, then its easy. You could use delegates as shown or the built in Func delegates –  nawfal Oct 26 '12 at 7:22
    
Thanks, Yannick I am able to understand your code, but what should be the definition (or signature) of the function uploadPic in Dll_A.. I mean to say how should I define it there? void uploadPic([WHAT SHOULD I WRITE HERE], int num) {} –  sujit Oct 26 '12 at 7:27
    
Following the code above, it should be something like void uploadPic(PictureDelegate func, int num) {} HTH –  Yannick Blondeau Oct 26 '12 at 7:30

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