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I am new to PHP classes and I am wondering how I can call a function which resides in the same class I am calling it from. Is this right or the best approach?

page1.php:

 $object=new MyClass();
 $object->func1(); 

MyClass.php:

class MyClass{

    function func1(){
        ....
         $object->func2();
    }

    function func2(){
        ....
    }

}

The reason I want to do this is because func1 will call func2 at the end of func1 but I will also need to use func2 independently of func1 in other circumstances and I thought if this is possible it will cut down on the code(even though it would be a simple copy/paste from func2 and place it at the end of func1).

Edit: or could I use:

self::func2();
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can use $this to refer to the current object, and thus call $this->func2().

(The value of $this is automatically populated by PHP when you're in an object instance's context.)

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thanks, would this also work: self::func2(); –  Drew Oct 26 '12 at 7:21
1  
No; self refers to the class, not the instance of the class (hence why it uses the scope resolution operator :: rather than the instance member operator ->). If func2 were a static method, then it would work, but if it's a regular method that needs to read from instance properties, you need to use $this. –  Amber Oct 26 '12 at 7:23
    
I'm a little confused if self:: pointed to the class would it not still execute the function? and/or do you mean by using this-> I am staying in the same instance and thus never leaving the scope of the first argument which was $object->func1(). I'm just trying to fully comprehend this[pun intended ;), sorry its 3:28am here] –  Drew Oct 26 '12 at 7:29
1  
So there are two things involved in a class: there is the class itself, which is just a set of definitions, and then there are instances of the class, which are individual objects created from that class. For instance, if you define a class A and then say $x = A() and $y = A(), you have one class (A) and two instances (x, y). Instances of the same class have all of the same methods, but don't necessarily share the same values for their properties. $this refers to the current instance (so for instance, if you called $x->func1(), then $this would refer to $x). –  Amber Oct 26 '12 at 7:35
1  
Whereas self would refer to A, which is just the class, and not the specific instance (x), so it wouldn't know which unique set of property values to use (because it wouldn't know to use the values for x rather than say y). –  Amber Oct 26 '12 at 7:36

Instead of

$object->func2

write

$this->func2()
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class MyClass{

    function func1(){
        ....
        $this->func2()
    }

    function func2(){
        ....
    }

}

you can use $this to call inside functions and inside variables in a class

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If you want to call from func1 use $this->func2();

to call from outside the class, use $object->func2();

but if you don't need func2, you can move code to the end of func1, you might need to change some code from func2, that' s your choice.

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