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I don't see how this method would be used 31 times when I try to recursively calculate 2^8.

Does this method calculate powers in O(logN) complexity?

When I run it the output is:

0
1
2
3
4
5
...
29
30
2^8 is: 256

Code

private static int power(int x, int y)
{
    System.out.println(step++);

    if (y == 0)
        return 1;

    return power(x, y/2) * power(x, y/2);
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here you're actually making two calls to the power method with the same values:

return power(x, y/2) * power(x, y/2);

Instead, you could make half as many calls if you write it like this:

int toReturn = power(x, y/2);
return toReturn * toReturn;

If we walk through your original example, we will make 31 calls, which is what you see (0 to 30). Walk through your code to see why:

power(2, 8)

power(2, 4)
power(2, 4)

power(2, 2)
power(2, 2)
power(2, 2)
power(2, 2)

power(2, 1)
power(2, 1)
power(2, 1)
power(2, 1)
power(2, 1)
power(2, 1)
power(2, 1)
power(2, 1)

power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
power(2, 0)
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And as every call does this, this goes on exponentially... –  ppeterka Oct 26 '12 at 7:39
    
I tried that, I keep getting error: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError at risingPowers.power(risingPowers.java:14) –  HelpNeeder Oct 26 '12 at 7:41
1  
@HelpNeeder StackOverflow-error on a suggestion on StackOverflow, Ironic.. :D haha; can you tell which line is 14 as per your workspace? @Cory Kendall No offense #peace –  Mukul Goel Oct 26 '12 at 7:45
1  
The line with: int toReturn = power(x, y/2);. –  HelpNeeder Oct 26 '12 at 7:46
1  
Never mind. I need to search for 0 value before I assign value to this. Thanks for your answer! –  HelpNeeder Oct 26 '12 at 7:47

There's absolutely no need for a divide-et-impera tree. That's why your code is recomputing more than once the same values.

You gain much better complexity with this simpler recursive code: (you can see that it is O(N))

private static int power(int x, int y)
{
    System.out.println(step++);

    if (y == 0)
        return 1;
    else
    {
        return x * power(x, y - 1);
    }
}

With X = 2 and Y = 3 the stack trace would be:

power(2,3) = 2 * power(2, 2);
power(2,2) = 2 * power(2, 1);
power(2,1) = 2 * power(2, 0);
power(2,0) = 1;
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As the other posters have pointed out, you're calling the power method too often. I just would like to add (and I don't want to do this as a comment) that I do not recommend the use of a static variable to count the levels of recursion. Instead, I'd recommend to pass the current step as another parameter to the function:

private static int power(int x, int y, int recursiveCallStep)
{
    System.out.println(recursiveCallStep++);

    if (y == 0)
        return 1;

    int toReturn = power(x, y/2, recursiveCallStep);
    return toReturn * toReturn;
}

The first call would then be:

int result = power(2, 8, 0);

Had you done this before, you'd have realised that the same step-number is output more than once.

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No, it is not O(logN), it is O(NlogN)

At each iteration, you are creating problems that have half the size of the problem (that is good) but you are creating two of them.

You should do, instead of

 return power(x, y/2) * power(x, y/2);

this

 int power = power(x, y/2);
 return power * power;
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