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I am sure there is already lots of discussions of this but we had a long discussion of this at work and there was no clear answer which is the right way to do this. We came up with two different techniques and maybe there is even more ways you can handle this situation.

First way:

git clone master
git checkout -b dev_branch
[do some changes, commit]
[master branch changed]
git checkout master
git pull
git checkout dev_branch
git rebase master
git push master

Second way:

git clone master
git checkout -b dev_branch
[do some changes, commit]
[master branch changed]
git checkout master
git pull
git rebase --onto master master dev_branch
git push master

Is there something wrong to push from local development branch to the actual master in this case?

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The second one won't do anything. You are rebasing anything on master since dev_branch onto master again. –  Charles Bailey Oct 26 '12 at 7:42
    
What do you mean? If I have changes in dev_branch and I want them to be rebased on the new changes in remote master, isn't this working? –  drodil Oct 26 '12 at 7:45
2  
@drodil That's not how --onto syntax works. For what you're trying to do, you'd need git rebase --onto master master dev_branch (the 2x master there is intentional). However, note that this results in rebase doing a checkout dev_branch as its first action, and thus is really redundant compared to both your first example and the more optimal workflow I gave in my answer. –  Amber Oct 26 '12 at 7:45
    
@Amber Oh. So I should only use git rebase dev_branch in the second case without --onto? –  drodil Oct 26 '12 at 7:47
1  
@drodil: Git's just a tool; you can choose your own policies. When you make a clone all your branches are local "dev branches"; there's no functional or practical difference which one (if any) you choose to push from. –  Charles Bailey Oct 26 '12 at 7:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not skip then unnecessary checkout of master?

git clone
git checkout -b dev_branch
[do some changes, commit]
git fetch origin
git rebase origin/master
git push origin HEAD:master
share|improve this answer
    
I find myself using HEAD:master all the time. Good to see that I'm not alone in recommending it. –  Charles Bailey Oct 26 '12 at 7:43

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