Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this example, StringBuffer is actually faster than StringBuilder, whereas I would have expected opposite results.

Is this something to do with optimizations being made by the JIT ? Does anyone know why StringBuffer would be faster than StringBuilder, even though it's methods are synchronized ?

Here's the code and the benchmark results:

public class StringOps {

    public static void main(String args[]) {

        long sConcatStart = System.nanoTime();
        String s = "";
        for(int i=0; i<1000; i++) {
            s += String.valueOf(i);
        }
        long sConcatEnd = System.nanoTime();

        long sBuffStart = System.nanoTime();
        StringBuffer buff = new StringBuffer();
        for(int i=0; i<1000; i++) {
            buff.append(i);
        }
        long sBuffEnd = System.nanoTime();

        long sBuilderStart = System.nanoTime();
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        for(int i=0; i<1000; i++) {
            builder.append(i);
        }
        long sBuilderEnd = System.nanoTime();

        System.out.println("Using + operator : " + (sConcatEnd-sConcatStart) + "ns");
        System.out.println("Using StringBuffer : " + (sBuffEnd-sBuffStart) + "ns");
        System.out.println("Using StringBuilder : " + (sBuilderEnd-sBuilderStart) + "ns");

        System.out.println("Diff '+'/Buff = " + (double)(sConcatEnd-sConcatStart)/(sBuffEnd-sBuffStart));
        System.out.println("Diff Buff/Builder = " + (double)(sBuffEnd-sBuffStart)/(sBuilderEnd-sBuilderStart));
    }
}


Benchmark results:

Using + operator : 17199609ns
Using StringBuffer : 244054ns
Using StringBuilder : 4351242ns
Diff '+'/Buff = 70.47460398108615
Diff Buff/Builder = 0.056088353624091696


UPDATE:

Thanks to everyone. Warmup was indeed the problem. Once some warmup code was added, the benchmarks changed to:

Using + operator : 8782460ns
Using StringBuffer : 343375ns
Using StringBuilder : 211171ns
Diff '+'/Buff = 25.576876592646524
Diff Buff/Builder = 1.6260518726529685


YMMV, but at least the overall ratios agree with what would be expected.

share|improve this question
    
docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/StringBuffer.html says: The StringBuilder class should generally be used in preference to this one (StringBuffer), as it supports all of the same operations but it is faster, as it performs no synchronization. –  Dan Iliescu Oct 26 '12 at 7:40
4  
@DanIliescu the OP probably knows that. He is surprised that the results were otherwise round, and the synchronized StringBuffer was faster. –  ppeterka Oct 26 '12 at 7:43
1  
@Parag please post the benchmark code what you run to test the speed, and the exact results, to be able to see what is going on... –  ppeterka Oct 26 '12 at 7:43
    
@ppeterka Edited the question to include the code –  Parag Oct 26 '12 at 7:54
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I had a look at your code, and the most likely reason that StringBuilder it appears to be slower is that your benchmark is not properly taking account of the effects of JVM warmup. In this case:

  • the JVM startup will generate an appreciable amount of garbage which needs to be dealt with, and
  • JIT compilation may kick in partway though the run.

Either or both of these could add to the time measured for the StringBuilder part of your test.

Please read the answers to this Question for more details: How do I write a correct micro-benchmark in Java?

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for sharing the link about pitfalls of micro-benchmarks... –  ppeterka Oct 26 '12 at 7:46
add comment

The exact same code, from java.lang.AbstractStringBuilder, is used in both cases, and both instances are created with the same capacity (16).

The only difference is the use of synchronized at the initial call.

I conclude this is a measurement artifact.

StringBuilder :

228    public StringBuilder append(int i) {
229        super.append(i);
230        return this;
231    }

StringBuffer :

345    public synchronized StringBuffer append(int i) {
346        super.append(i);
347        return this;
348    }

AbstractStringBuilder :

605     public AbstractStringBuilder append(int i) {
606         if (i == Integer.MIN_VALUE) {
607             append("-2147483648");
608             return this;
609         }
610         int appendedLength = (i < 0) ? Integer.stringSize(-i) + 1
611                                      : Integer.stringSize(i);
612         int spaceNeeded = count + appendedLength;
613         if (spaceNeeded > value.length)
614             expandCapacity(spaceNeeded);
615         Integer.getChars(i, spaceNeeded, value);
616         count = spaceNeeded;
617         return this;
618     }


110     void expandCapacity(int minimumCapacity) {
111         int newCapacity = (value.length + 1) * 2;
112         if (newCapacity < 0) {
113             newCapacity = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
114         } else if (minimumCapacity > newCapacity) {
115             newCapacity = minimumCapacity;
116         }
117         value = Arrays.copyOf(value, newCapacity);
118     }

(expandCapacity isn't overrided)

This blog post says more about :

  • the difficulty there is in micro-benchmarking
  • the fact that you shoudln't post "results" of a benchmark without looking a little at what you measured (here the common superclass)

Note that the "slowness" of synchronized in recent JDK can be considered a myth. All tests I made or read conclude there is generally no reason to lose much time avoiding the synchronizations.

share|improve this answer
add comment

When you run that code on yourself, you would see a varying result. Sometimes StringBuffer is faster and sometimes StringBuilder is faster. The likely reason for this may be the time taken for JVM warmup before using StringBuffer and StringBuilder as stated by @Stephen, which can vary on multiple runs.

This is the result of 4 runs I made: -

Using StringBuffer : 398445ns
Using StringBuilder : 272800ns

Using StringBuffer : 411155ns
Using StringBuilder : 281600ns

Using StringBuffer : 386711ns
Using StringBuilder : 662933ns

Using StringBuffer : 413600ns
Using StringBuilder : 270356ns

Of course the exact figures cannot be predicted based on just 4 execution.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I have modified your code a little bit and added the warmup loops. My observations are consistent most of the time that StringBuilder is faster most of the times.

I am running on Ubuntu12.04 box which runs on windows 7 virtually and have 2 GB RAM allocated to the VM.

public class StringOps {

public static void main(String args[]) {

    for(int j=0;j<10;j++){
        StringBuffer buff = new StringBuffer();
        for(int i=0; i<1000; i++) {
                buff.append(i);
        }
    buff = new StringBuffer();
    long sBuffStart = System.nanoTime();
    for(int i=0; i<10000; i++) {
                buff.append(i);
        }
    long sBuffEnd = System.nanoTime();


        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        for(int i=0; i<1000; i++) {
                builder.append(i);
        }
    builder = new StringBuilder();
    long sBuilderStart = System.nanoTime();
    for(int i=0; i<10000; i++) {
                builder.append(i);
        }   
        long sBuilderEnd = System.nanoTime();

        if((sBuffEnd-sBuffStart)>(sBuilderEnd-sBuilderStart)) {
        System.out.println("String Builder is faster") ; 
    }
    else {
        System.out.println("String Buffer is faster") ;
    }
    }
}

}

Results are :

String Builder is faster
String Builder is faster
String Builder is faster
String Builder is faster
String Buffer is faster
String Builder is faster
String Builder is faster
String Builder is faster
String Builder is faster
String Builder is faster
share|improve this answer
add comment

I suggest

  • breaking each loop into a seperate method so the optimisation of one doesn't impact another.
  • ignore the first 10K iterations
  • run the test for at least 2 seconds.
  • run the test multiple times to ensure its reproducible.

When you run code less than 10000 times it might not trigger the code to be compiled as the default -XX:CompileThreshold=10000. Part of the reason it does this is to collect statistics on how to best optimise the code. However, when a loop triggers compilation, it triggers it for the whole method which can make later loops either look a) better as they are compiled before they start b) worse as the are compiled without collecting any statistics.


Consider the following code

public static void main(String... args) {
    int runs = 1000;
    for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++)
        String.valueOf(i);

    System.out.printf("%-10s%-10s%-10s%-9s%-9s%n", "+ oper", "SBuffer", "SBuilder", "+/Buff", "Buff/Builder");
    for (int t = 0; t < 5; t++) {
        long sConcatTime = timeStringConcat(runs);
        long sBuffTime = timeStringBuffer(runs);
        long sBuilderTime = timeStringBuilder(runs);

        System.out.printf("%,7dns %,7dns %,7dns ",
                sConcatTime / runs, sBuffTime / runs, sBuilderTime / runs);
        System.out.printf("%8.2f %8.2f%n",
                (double) sConcatTime / sBuffTime, (double) sBuffTime / sBuilderTime);
    }
}

public static double dontOptimiseAway = 0;

private static long timeStringConcat(int runs) {
    long sConcatStart = System.nanoTime();
    for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        String s = "";
        for (int i = 0; i < runs; i += 100) {
            s += String.valueOf(i);
        }
        dontOptimiseAway = Double.parseDouble(s);
    }
    return System.nanoTime() - sConcatStart;
}

private static long timeStringBuffer(int runs) {
    long sBuffStart = System.nanoTime();
    for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        StringBuffer buff = new StringBuffer();
        for (int i = 0; i < runs; i += 100)
            buff.append(i);
        dontOptimiseAway = Double.parseDouble(buff.toString());
    }
    return System.nanoTime() - sBuffStart;
}

private static long timeStringBuilder(int runs) {
    long sBuilderStart = System.nanoTime();
    for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        StringBuilder buff = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < runs; i += 100)
            buff.append(i);
        dontOptimiseAway = Double.parseDouble(buff.toString());
    }
    return System.nanoTime() - sBuilderStart;
}

prints with runs = 1000

+ oper    SBuffer   SBuilder  +/Buff   Buff/Builder
  6,848ns   3,169ns   3,287ns     2.16     0.96
  6,039ns   2,937ns   3,311ns     2.06     0.89
  6,025ns   3,315ns   2,276ns     1.82     1.46
  4,718ns   2,254ns   2,180ns     2.09     1.03
  5,183ns   2,319ns   2,186ns     2.23     1.06

however if you increase the number of runs = 10,000

+ oper    SBuffer   SBuilder  +/Buff   Buff/Builder
  3,791ns     400ns     357ns     9.46     1.12
  1,426ns     139ns     113ns    10.23     1.23
    323ns     141ns     117ns     2.29     1.20
    317ns     115ns      78ns     2.76     1.47
    317ns     127ns     103ns     2.49     1.23

and if we increase the runs to 100,000 I get

+ oper    SBuffer   SBuilder  +/Buff   Buff/Builder
  3,946ns     195ns     128ns    20.23     1.52
  2,364ns     113ns      86ns    20.80     1.32
  2,189ns     142ns      95ns    15.34     1.49
  2,036ns     142ns      96ns    14.31     1.48
  2,566ns     114ns      88ns    22.46     1.29

Note: The + operation has slowed down as the time complexity of the loop is O(N^2)

share|improve this answer
    
Good point about creating different methods. Was there any specific reason, you chose a double loop in the methods ? –  Parag Oct 26 '12 at 8:38
    
I chose a loop within a loop to prevent the size of the StringBuilder being an issue. The assumption being that the amount of numbers in one string will be around 1000 not 100,000 for the last test. i.e. its an attempt to make the test slightly more realistic. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 26 '12 at 8:44
    
Added an edit on why the compile threshold matters. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 26 '12 at 8:47
    
Great point, thanks ! –  Parag Oct 26 '12 at 8:55
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.