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I wonder about how to communicate between processes on unix system or windows I found some article http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-spunix_sharedmemory/index.html which says that shared memory is good way to communicate between processes. but I want both in local system and among multi-system so I am not sure what is the best to among pipe, mailbox, named pipe, signal, shared memory, socket, etc...

so I found some example for this

/* tcpserver.c */

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>


int main()
{
        int sock, connected, bytes_recieved , true = 1;  
        char send_data [1024] , recv_data[1024];       

        struct sockaddr_in server_addr,client_addr;    
        int sin_size;

        if ((sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)) == -1) {
            perror("Socket");
            exit(1);
        }

        if (setsockopt(sock,SOL_SOCKET,SO_REUSEADDR,&true,sizeof(int)) == -1) {
            perror("Setsockopt");
            exit(1);
        }

        server_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;         
        server_addr.sin_port = htons(5000);     
        server_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY; 
        bzero(&(server_addr.sin_zero),8); 

        if (bind(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&server_addr, sizeof(struct sockaddr))
                                                                       == -1) {
            perror("Unable to bind");
            exit(1);
        }

        if (listen(sock, 5) == -1) {
            perror("Listen");
            exit(1);
        }

    printf("\nTCPServer Waiting for client on port 5000");
        fflush(stdout);


        while(1)
        {  

            sin_size = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);

            connected = accept(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&client_addr,&sin_size);

            printf("\n I got a connection from (%s , %d)",
                   inet_ntoa(client_addr.sin_addr),ntohs(client_addr.sin_port));

            while (1)
            {
              printf("\n SEND (q or Q to quit) : ");
              gets(send_data);

              if (strcmp(send_data , "q") == 0 || strcmp(send_data , "Q") == 0)
              {
                send(connected, send_data,strlen(send_data), 0); 
                close(connected);
                break;
              }

              else
                 send(connected, send_data,strlen(send_data), 0);  

              bytes_recieved = recv(connected,recv_data,1024,0);

              recv_data[bytes_recieved] = '\0';

              if (strcmp(recv_data , "q") == 0 || strcmp(recv_data , "Q") == 0)
              {
                close(connected);
                break;
              }

              else 
              printf("\n RECIEVED DATA = %s " , recv_data);
              fflush(stdout);
            }
        }       

      close(sock);
      return 0;
} 

this is c code for server and

# TCP client example
import socket
client_socket = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
client_socket.connect(("localhost", 5000))
while 1:
    data = client_socket.recv(512)
    if ( data == 'q' or data == 'Q'):
        client_socket.close()
        break;
    else:
        print "RECIEVED:" , data
        data = raw_input ( "SEND( TYPE q or Q to Quit):" )
        if (data <> 'Q' and data <> 'q'):
            client_socket.send(data)
        else:
            client_socket.send(data)
            client_socket.close()
            break;

this is python code for client

those can communicate between them. but they allocated their own memory to save the received data so I am curious if I can access the server memory not copying another memory to receive the data. I think shared memory is a way to do this but among multi-system, it cannot be useful I think. I hope you can recommend the best way to do this!

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closed as not constructive by Brian Roach, EJP, j0k, Andy Hayden, skolima Oct 26 '12 at 12:50

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
By "multi-system" do you mean networked computers? In that case networking sockets is the only way to go. However, you can create abstractions so that if you run the processes on the same computer you can use named pipes (or local/UNIX sockets) and if the programs are on different computers then use network sockets. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 26 '12 at 8:13
    
I mean different machine, and would you recommend any tutorial or manual for networking socket? or if you can modify my example, I would be happy. –  wonjun Oct 26 '12 at 8:31
    
The examples you have seems okay. You can not get shared memory among a network of computers, unless you use some kind of super-computing cluster. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 26 '12 at 8:38
    
then, socket is better than other on local system and different machines? –  wonjun Oct 26 '12 at 8:43
    
Surely it is obvious that separate computer systems don't have any common memory that can be shared? –  EJP Oct 26 '12 at 8:56
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1 Answer 1

If the processes are running on the same machine, shared memory is a good choice. However, the shared memory technique is not available when processes are running on different machines. So I recommend you write a common interface, if the processes are running on the same machine, use the shared memory strategy in your implementation, otherwise, use socket.

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1  
can I use only socket for both sides? –  wonjun Oct 26 '12 at 8:28
    
You can use socket whether or not the processes are on the same machine. –  RichardUSTC Oct 26 '12 at 8:36
    
above example is the example of TCP socket communication and I doubt that i can use shared memory with this example. –  wonjun Nov 7 '12 at 4:49
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